Raw Food Diet

Discussion dedicated to promoting the well-being of your dog through diet, exercise and general health tips.

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***Melissa***
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Re: Raw Food Diet

Post by ***Melissa*** » Mon Feb 22, 2010 8:52 am

pmcrae71 wrote:I thought you guys were doing the veggie cubes to trick the dog into eating them thinking its a treat. I will get some ice trays and a blender today.
Mine won't eat them while still frozen, it MUST be defrosted, but still cool, if it gets heated up only a wee bit, they won't eat it either :roll: :lol:
There is no psychiatrist in the world like a puppy licking your face. ~Ben Williams

Leigha
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Re: Raw Food Diet

Post by Leigha » Mon Feb 22, 2010 11:05 am

Lu will eat them simply because they're there. Bruiser and Kole will only eat them as a mush, and only if they've had olive oil drizzled on them. My dogs are foodies :roll:

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***Melissa***
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Re: Raw Food Diet

Post by ***Melissa*** » Tue Feb 23, 2010 2:23 am

:D I had to blend the offal too ***that was super gross***, they won't eat it as chunks :roll: So now I mix the veggies with offal 2 or 3 times a week.

Is the raw meaty bone enough meat for one day, or are we suppose to add some grounded meat (not offal) to the veggie mix as well? :?:
There is no psychiatrist in the world like a puppy licking your face. ~Ben Williams

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Nettle
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Re: Raw Food Diet

Post by Nettle » Tue Feb 23, 2010 5:15 am

Doesn't really matter. My dogs get a bone day, a mush and veg day, a slab of meat day, or several days, depending what I have.

Poor you, liquidising the offal. Next time, give them each a chunk. They soon learn how to eat it. Remember, hunger is a great condiment. :D
A dog is never bad or naughty - it is simply being a dog

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Leigha
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Re: Raw Food Diet

Post by Leigha » Tue Feb 23, 2010 5:59 am

I found with the offal that they have an easier time eating it if it's frozen. They all struggled with it when it was thawed, but were okay when they were frozen offal cubes.

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***Melissa***
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Re: Raw Food Diet

Post by ***Melissa*** » Tue Feb 23, 2010 6:11 am

Thanx Nettle :D Bibi is okay - she'll still eat the offal in almost any form that I present it to her, although I won't call it her favourite either, but Strikes is a little fussy. I tried them (as chunks) defrosted, frozen, warmed up, with veggies, without veggies, with a little garlic, with melted cheese over them (he only eats the cheese :roll: ). I tried to feed it for breakfast - he'll just sniff & walk away. :roll:

I'll keep on trying though, but for now at least I know he's eating it blended, mixed with veggies :roll: :lol:
There is no psychiatrist in the world like a puppy licking your face. ~Ben Williams

emmabeth
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Re: Raw Food Diet

Post by emmabeth » Tue Feb 23, 2010 7:18 am

I have to say, i go with the vileness of blended offal..... over the vileness of discovering hidden, much treasured, loved and stashed away for a rain day whole offal, every time! I do have a pathetic constitution when it comes to discovering ancient raw meat. (Or even not that ancient raw meat).
West Midlands based 1-2-1 Training & Behaviour Canine Consultant

pmcrae71
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Re: Raw Food Diet

Post by pmcrae71 » Wed Feb 24, 2010 10:34 am

Well, I tried the raw veggies and chicken breast the day before yesterday. Connor got real sick that afternoon. I gave them one chicken breast cut into small cubes and the veggies were chopped really fine. He didn't want to eat at all yesterday. He is still active and not showing any more signs of being sick to his stomach. I thawed the chicken in the frige over night and rinsed it before I cut it up so I'm not sure if that was what made him sick. Maybe I gave him too much? But it was several hrs after he ate that he got sick. I only gave him about a 1/4 cup of the chicken.

We got the health master blender yesterday. It came with receipes for smoothies and what not. I made some smoothie this morning and mixed it with their kibble. They won't eat it. So back to square one on that. Maybe I'll put it in their congs and freeze them that way.

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***Melissa***
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Re: Raw Food Diet

Post by ***Melissa*** » Thu Feb 25, 2010 2:58 am

I'm also new at this, but this is what I've found:
My 1st veggie mix they ate. The ingredients I used are somewhere on this thread. :roll: :) The second mix they did NOT want to eat - I tried other veggies and they DID not like that at all. I thought they didn't want to eat veggies anymore. :? So for the 3rd mix I used the same as the 1st and now they're eating it again. :D
Could it be that Connor just don't like some of the veggies you use?
There is no psychiatrist in the world like a puppy licking your face. ~Ben Williams

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sez88
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Re: Raw Food Diet

Post by sez88 » Thu Apr 01, 2010 9:01 am

Hey :)

So i did some research and found out that:

Feed 2-3% of body weight so...
body weight = 20kg Food weight = 400g – 600g per day split in 2 meals

Menu...

Monday
am- 200g Liver and mixed veg
pm- 200g ground meat and tbspn natural yogurt

Tuesday
am- 200g ground meat and mixed veg
pm- 200g turkey

Wednesday
am- 200g ground meat and tbspn natural yogurt
pm- 200g Fish and mixed veg

Thursday
am- 200g ground meat and mixed veg
pm- 200g Chicken

Friday
am-200g ground meat and tbspn natural yogurt
pm- 200g Turkey

Saturday
am-200g ground meat and tbspn mixed veg
pm- 200g Chicken

Sunday
am- 200g ground meat and tbspn natural yogurt
pm- 200g Turkey

Is that right? do i need to add more veg or anything?
thoughts please
Enjoying life with our pup charlie...he had us at 'woof'!

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***Melissa***
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Re: Raw Food Diet

Post by ***Melissa*** » Tue Apr 06, 2010 6:30 am

I give veggies to mine every day, but I'm not sure whether that's 'right'. It was quite a mission a first, but now it's part of our daily routine, and really not difficult. It took me about two weeks to get the quantities right and know how much veggie cubes to feed, etc. (Although I'm feeding less of the 'meaty part' for Striker now b/c he have to loose some weight.

I do know that too much veggies can give them a runny tummy, and to feed offal only once or twice a week - something to do with high iron or vitamin content or something...but they can overdose on it
There is no psychiatrist in the world like a puppy licking your face. ~Ben Williams

emmabeth
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Re: Raw Food Diet

Post by emmabeth » Fri Jun 11, 2010 10:35 pm

Bump for new posters.
West Midlands based 1-2-1 Training & Behaviour Canine Consultant

Wicket
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Re: Raw Food Diet

Post by Wicket » Sat Jun 12, 2010 5:51 am

Wow...what a great thread! I've learned a lot. Since I'm still persuading my parents to switch to a higher quality kibble, I doubt they'd make the money and time investment to feed the dogs raw food. Whenever I move out, I might try it especially since my chi-poo can be picky. Here's no harm in educating myself now though...

I've read "Dog training for dummies" which the Volhards recommended raw food but didn't cover it in depth. Can anyone recommend books/website for educational purposes?

easilyconfused
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Re: Raw Food Diet

Post by easilyconfused » Wed Jul 14, 2010 6:30 pm

My first post on this site, I thought I'd share the diet I use with my Lab's/bearded collie's. I have adapted this from allot of research and the help of some very kind internet folk.

For "Meat" I use chickens chopped into portions, pork and lamb ribs/shoulder, turkey legs/thighs, ox tail and vary in game when I can get it(pheasant/rabbit etc). I used to work as a butcher and have a good local butcher I use, so after cutting them into weighed portions I put them in a sandwich bag with a spoonful (100g) of veg mix. I freeze these so I only have to stock up once every couple of months. I can then defrost the next days food each evening and just have to empty a bag into a bowl :)

Veg Mix - Blended

Carrots
Cabbage (dark green like savoy)
Swede
Parsnips
Green beans
Cauliflower
Spinach
Sweet Potato
Tomato
apple
Banana
Pear
Garlic
Fenugreek
Mint
Oil
Turmeric
Apple Cider Vinegar
Almonds
Brazils
Cashews
Hazelnuts
Pecans
Peanuts
Walnuts

I use a "bag" of each item, but the size of each varies depending on what is for sale at the time.

During a week I feed

AM 300-400g Green Tripe
PM 300-400g Meat (100g Veg)

AM 300-400g Green Tripe + 125g Tinned sardines in tom sauce
PM 300-400g Meat (100g Veg)

AM 300-400g Green Tripe
PM 300-400g Meat (100g Veg)

AM 250g liver (lamb/pig/ox/chicken varies weekly) 1 large whole raw egg
PM 300-400g Meat (100g Veg)

AM 300-400g Green Tripe
PM 300-400g Meat (100g Veg)

AM 300-400g Green Tripe
PM 300-400g Meat (100g Veg)

AM 200g Kidney/200g heart (lamb/pig/ox heart and kidney from same type of animal fed together)
PM 300-400g Meat (100g Veg)

Sizes of portions vary as the shape of the dog is the best guide to amounts. I would never go back to commercial dog food.
Last edited by easilyconfused on Thu Jul 15, 2010 5:51 pm, edited 1 time in total.

easilyconfused
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Re: Raw Food Diet

Post by easilyconfused » Thu Jul 15, 2010 5:51 pm

Got some more time tonight so I thought I'd add some useful info on the veg I use.

Vitamins/Minerals

Carrots A, B1, B6, C and K.
Cabbage B1, Folate and C, Sulphur.
Swede B6, Folate and C.
Parsnips B1, B6, Folate, C, Potassium and Phosphorus.
Green beans A, Folate and C.
Cauliflower B1, B6, C and K, Potassium.
Spinach A, B6, Folate, C, K, Calcium, Iron, Phosphorus, and Magnesium.
Sweet Potato B1, B6, C and E, Potassium.
Tomato vitamins A, B6 and C.
Apple, banana, pear C, B6 C, Potassium and Magnesium.
Almonds B, E, Calcium, Copper, Iron, Potassium, Magnesium, Phosphorus and Zinc
Brazils B1, B6, Calcium, Copper, Potassium, Magnesium, Phosphorus, Sulphur, Selenium and Zinc
Cashews B1, B6, Copper, Iron, Potassium, Magnesium, Phosphorus, Sulphur, Selenium and Zinc
Hazelnuts B1, B6,Calcium, Potassium, Magnesium, Phosphorus, Sulphur and Zinc
Peanuts B1, B6, Folate and Niacin / Copper, Magnesium, Phosphorus, Sulphur and Zinc
Pecans B1, Copper, Magnesium, Phosphorus, Sulphur and Zinc
Walnuts B6,Copper, Magnesium and Phosphorus

Garlic Allicin and Diallyl Sulphides
Apple cider vinegar manganese, magnesium, phosphorus, calcium and silicon (helps fight against osteoporosis)
Turmeric has been linked to anti inflammatory, anti bacterial, and liver and heart protecting effects. It is used to used to ease joint pain, and inflammation associated with arthritis, and is a good source of antioxidants.
Fenugreek and Mint are good at repelling fleas/ticks.

Vitamins/Mineral usage

Vitamin A – vision, bone growth, reproduction and health of skin, also acts as an antioxidant.
Vitamin B1 – also known as thiamin, helps convert carbohydrates and fats into energy. Cannot be stored in the body, but once absorbed, it is concentrated in muscle tissue.
Vitamin B2 – also known as riboflavin, necessary for the release of energy from carbohydrates, and for normal growth and development.
Niacin – necessary for production and breakdown of glucose, fats and amino acids, development, maintenance and function of the skin, intestine and stomach, as well as the nervous system, and in manufacturing dna.
Pantothenic acid – a b-complex vitamin, also known as B5, helps break down proteins, and their amino acids, fats and carbohydrates enabling the production of energy.
B6 – also known as pyridoxine, involved in the production and digestion of amino acids, and helps the body manufacture the hormone insulin. It is involved with anti bodies that fight infection, and certain chemicals that send messages between nerve cells, as well as in the production of histamine.
Vitamin B12 – also known as cyanocobalamin or cobalamin, is released from food in the stomach, and has to bind with a protein called intrinsic factor to be able to be absorbed by the body. It is necessary for normal growth and development.
Biotin – a b-complex vitamin, essential for converting proteins, carbohydrates and fats into forms the body can use.
Folate – another b-complex vitamins, plays a vital role in the substance that makes up our genes, working with vitamin B12 to form haemoglobin, and converting the amino acid homocysteine to methionine.
Vitamin C – also known as ascorbic acid, is the least stable of vitamins and destroyed by processing, essential for the formation of collagen, an important structural protein that strengthens bones and blood vessels.
Vitamin D – a fat soluble vitamin that has an essential role in the absorbption and use of calcium.
Vitamin E – one of natures most effective antioxidants, and protects the body against free radicals.
Vitamin K – an essential component in the body’s normal blood clotting process.
Calcium – the main mineral present in bones and teeth.
Magnesium – plays a vital role in the formation of bones, teeth, and with the minerals calcium, sodium and potassium, is involved in transmitting nerve signals.
Phosphorus – essential for bones and teeth.
Potassium – together with sodium and chloride potassium is involved in controlling the amount of water and maintaining the correct acid-alkali balance in the body.
Sodium – vital for controlling the amount of water in the body, maintaining normal pH of blood, transmitting nerve signals and helping in muscular contraction.
Sulphur – plays a key role in the manufacture of amino acids and in the conversion of carbohydrates to a form that the body can use.
Chromium – works with insulin to help bind it to it’s receptors.
Copper – plays a key role in several body function, including production of pigment in skin, hair and eyes, production of healthy bones, teeth and heart, and the protection of body cells from chemical damage.
Iodine – associated with thyroid function.
Iron – an essential mineral in all cells, although only needed in small quantities, is a component of haemoglobin, the oxygen carrying protein in red blood cells.
Selenium – is an antioxidant and part of an enzyme that protects cells from the damaging effects of free radicals.
Zinc – needed in minute amounts, essential for the breakdown of carbohydrates, fats and proteins, in normal cell division, growth and repair.

Allicin is active once garlic is chopped or crushed, and is linked to anti biotic and anti fungal properties.
Diallyl Sulphides is linked to improving blood and circulation.

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