The Halti

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Jeru
Posts: 2
Joined: Thu Jan 22, 2015 10:53 am

The Halti

Post by Jeru » Thu Jan 22, 2015 11:51 am

Hello, I am new to this forum, and I am training my first puppy. I have been learning methods from training videos and books because I do not wanna make mistakes with my pup Chester. He is almost 6 months now and he always resorts to pulling on a leash (and lunging). I have tried Victoria's method as well as some other training methods. He did good for awhile but would always resort to it again regardless of treats or no treats. He is getting a bit big now and not to mention a lot stronger and walks are not peaceful on leash. (though they are peaceful off leash in the forest) So I went out and bought a head Halti, a prong collar or choke chain is defiantly out of question for him. He is very sensitive and frankly.. I love him too much. I understand they need to adjust to it but he will bury his head into me like a child might when crying... It does work, he reacts to the slightest correction and any yanking is very unnecessary. I have already have formulated a plan to wean him off it after he is walking very nicely on it. So far I have just tooken him for walks around the yard and house with it on, making sure to give him plenty of treats and praise. (just got it yesterday) So what do you think? Is it something unnecessary or should I continue on with it?

Thank you for your time. Constructive criticism is welcome.
ps. My pup is half german shep, and mother was a lab crossed with collie

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Nettle
Posts: 10708
Joined: Sun Apr 13, 2008 1:40 pm

Re: The Halti

Post by Nettle » Fri Jan 23, 2015 4:45 am

Hi and welcome. You have a lovely breed mix, and you are very wise to get the walking sorted before he becomes a big dog.

For walking control, I much prefer the combined use of a harness where the lead attaches at the chest, and using a second lead off an ordinary flat collar. This is because anything that pulls on the dog's face has potential to damage the neck. Not that it will but that it can, especially if the dog dives at something. You have two herding breeds in the mix so double chance of a dog that wants to lunge at cars etc. Best not to start!

What you do is walk normally using the collar lead, and when the dog plays up, use the harness lead because that will turn him towards you using his own strength not yours. It isn't anything like as difficult as it sounds - horse riders often use two reins for more delicacy of control. But a dog with the lead attached to the top of the harness can pull you all over the place. This is why the chest attachment is so important.

Alongside this, make sure to create a dog that looks to you for rewards when walking nicely. Make these rewards super high value. As well as yummy treats, your breed mix might like to carry a toy, as labs and Sheps are 'mouthy' breeds. Tis calms them too. Make sure this particular toy only comes out on walks, which makes it extra interesting and motivational.

When you walk, always put yourself between your dog and anything he might fear, want to lunge at, or otherwise react to. Your body is a safe barrier. If you see something you think he will react to, turn back, go another way, go a further distance from, and then reward him when he is calm.

I don't want to overwhelm you with advice, so I'll stop for now, but others will be along to help. :)
A dog is never bad or naughty - it is simply being a dog

SET YOURSELF UP FOR SUCCESS

Jeru
Posts: 2
Joined: Thu Jan 22, 2015 10:53 am

Re: The Halti

Post by Jeru » Sat Jan 24, 2015 9:38 am

Nettle wrote:Hi and welcome. You have a lovely breed mix, and you are very wise to get the walking sorted before he becomes a big dog.

For walking control, I much prefer the combined use of a harness where the lead attaches at the chest, and using a second lead off an ordinary flat collar. This is because anything that pulls on the dog's face has potential to damage the neck. Not that it will but that it can, especially if the dog dives at something. You have two herding breeds in the mix so double chance of a dog that wants to lunge at cars etc. Best not to start!

What you do is walk normally using the collar lead, and when the dog plays up, use the harness lead because that will turn him towards you using his own strength not yours. It isn't anything like as difficult as it sounds - horse riders often use two reins for more delicacy of control. But a dog with the lead attached to the top of the harness can pull you all over the place. This is why the chest attachment is so important.

Alongside this, make sure to create a dog that looks to you for rewards when walking nicely. Make these rewards super high value. As well as yummy treats, your breed mix might like to carry a toy, as labs and Sheps are 'mouthy' breeds. Tis calms them too. Make sure this particular toy only comes out on walks, which makes it extra interesting and motivational.

When you walk, always put yourself between your dog and anything he might fear, want to lunge at, or otherwise react to. Your body is a safe barrier. If you see something you think he will react to, turn back, go another way, go a further distance from, and then reward him when he is calm.

I don't want to overwhelm you with advice, so I'll stop for now, but others will be along to help. :)
Thank you very much for the reply and the advice.
He is scared of cats because the cat we own who is much older than Chester (the dog) is quite the bully. We were hoping he and the cat could be friends but oh well.
You mentioned teaching the dog to look to me for rewards. Chester already knows that, but after he gets the reward he pulls ahead, I guess that is because he got what he wanted at that moment. After a couple mins he might decide he wants another treat. Then he will walk at a heel while watching me. He can be crafty.. Maybe I will try the toy idea.

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