Walks before rabies vaccine

Share your favorite training tips, ideas and methods with other Positively members!

Moderators: emmabeth, BoardHost

Post Reply
BFJ
Posts: 12
Joined: Fri Nov 24, 2017 1:04 pm

Walks before rabies vaccine

Post by BFJ » Sat Dec 16, 2017 12:53 pm

Hi all,

Dusty the 14 week old standard poodle has had his three sets of vaccines as of last Monday but he is still to have his rabies vaccine (at 16 weeks). We're from the UK originally and have not had to deal with this before. We would like to get him out for proper walks as soon as possible but also don't want to put him at risk. We are in quite a rural area and have so far been taking him for walks around the town but i was wondering if a footpath in a more rural area would be ok? Any advice?
Last edited by BFJ on Sat Dec 16, 2017 1:09 pm, edited 1 time in total.

User avatar
JudyN
Posts: 6664
Joined: Tue Jul 26, 2011 1:20 pm
Location: Dorset, UK
Contact:

Re: Walks before rabies vaccine

Post by JudyN » Sat Dec 16, 2017 1:03 pm

Would you be able to ask your vet about the incidence of rabies in your area? I'm in the UK so can't advise but I know someone was told by her vet where it was safe and where not so safe to let her puppy walk before the course of vaccinations was complete.
Jasper, lurcher, born December 2009

BFJ
Posts: 12
Joined: Fri Nov 24, 2017 1:04 pm

Re: Walks before rabies vaccine

Post by BFJ » Sat Dec 16, 2017 1:09 pm

Good idea, thanks!

jacksdad
Posts: 4833
Joined: Thu Dec 10, 2009 10:48 pm

Re: Walks before rabies vaccine

Post by jacksdad » Sat Dec 16, 2017 9:57 pm

around where I live, while the rabies vaccine is required, unless the vet says otherwise I advise getting that pup out into the world.

Socialization isn't about just going up to another dog and saying hi, it is about seeing other dogs, seeing other dogs play, seeing/hearing the public transpiration bus go by, seeing/hearing cars, trucks, fire/police/ambulances racing by. people on bikes, running, walking with hats, with canes, limping, in wheel chairs and so on....walking in a pet store and working out that the broom against the wall isn't' a monster that will eat you (true story).

Socialization is first and foremost learning what is normal in your world. NOT just going up to other dogs/animals to play and "say hi".

it is possible to get the socialization ball rolling without letting your pup actually play with random dogs you know nothing about thus avoiding a bite, thus avoiding the risk of rabies.

The more critical shots to worry about as far as being out in the world are the ones for things such as parvovirus, distemper, Bordetella, or Leptospira as some of these are transmittable by means other than bites.

The right course of action is to talk to your vet as they will know what the risks are for your area. An up to date vet will also be able to advise you how to balance the need to get out and socialize and the need to have various vaccinations.

User avatar
Erica
Posts: 2668
Joined: Fri Aug 05, 2011 9:35 pm
Location: North Carolina

Re: Walks before rabies vaccine

Post by Erica » Sat Dec 16, 2017 10:45 pm

Personally, socialization and experiences are very important to me. Rabies is known in my area, but generally, I stick to areas with good visibility. It's easier to see a drooling, staggering fox on a wide country road with empty, tilled fields to either side than it is in a crowded subdivision with lots of houses, cars, bushes, etc. Most of the close-up encounters with rabid critters in our area are in said subdivisions. I have seen a couple rabid critters in quieter areas, but with the better visibility I can easily avoid them and call animal control.

I avoid interactions with unknown dogs, even when my dog's a fully vaccinated adult. A bite doesn't have to transmit disease to make your life difficult. By keeping interactions with other dogs to dogs you know to be puppy-friendly and up to date on vaccines, you'll be keeping your pup safe physically and behaviorally. :) I like to teach my dog to pay attention to me when there are other dogs around, rather than expect to play with them. It makes life much easier! I want them to be able to handle being near other dogs, but not be obsessed with them. Delta gets playdates with his buddies in fenced yards, off-leash. Even if we see his best pal on a walk, we don't greet on leash.

Check with your vet, though, and be ready to pick your darling pup up. Poodles are absolutely fantastic dogs, and if your pup is anything like my boy Delta turned out to be, you'll be in for a smart, funny dog!
Delta, standard poodle, born 6/30/14

Post Reply

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 4 guests