Jumping / pawing up whilst out on walks

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Ocelot0411
Posts: 587
Joined: Thu May 24, 2007 7:30 am

Jumping / pawing up whilst out on walks

Post by Ocelot0411 » Wed Apr 02, 2008 9:39 am

Bit of help please folks, I know that jumping up is a common issue and there is a lot about it on this forum, but my problem at present seems to be a bit different.

When in the house, I ignore Ellie's jumping up and turn my back on her then give her attention when all four paws hit the floor. However, she is a bit of a terror for jumping up when we are out on walks and unfortunately this behaviour is not directed solely towards me. Today she 'pawed' at a lady in the woods and got her nice leather coat filthy. Said lady was NOT happy and I was, once again, given the 'control that dog look'. ASBO pup strikes again :oops: .

So what happens is this, we are out and about walking Ellie comes running towards me, sometimes she runs past me, sometime she stops in front of me and sometimes she jumps up at me both paws on thighs and then shoots off again, hit and run style. I sometimes think its almost like a 'c'mon mum hurry up' type thing. As I say though she does do it to other people too, particularly my mum who has a bad back and really can do without a big dog jumping at her.

Sometimes she will just hit you with one paw and then off again, as she seems to be very expressive with her paws in the same way as boxers are. This is what she did to the lady in the woods today. I think its just attention seeking and I have tried to ignore it and turn my back on her, but its quite difficult as firstly its hard to tell if she is going to jump or run past until its too late and also sometimes she will simply jump at your back.

This is probably Ellie's worst habit and I would love to get a handle on it as other than this she is absolutely fab off the lead. It just I really don't want her pawing / jumping at strangers as they may, quite rightly so, be rather annoyed by it.

Any tips?

danabanana
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Location: NE England

Post by danabanana » Wed Apr 02, 2008 10:15 am

I am no help I'm afraid, my little monster took off out of the park and up a street chasing some bikes today! She's never chased bikes before and thankfully the kids on them were well-mannered enough to turn around and come back for me! Back to a long line for a while methinks...

Ocelot0411
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Post by Ocelot0411 » Sun Apr 06, 2008 12:34 pm

Just bumping this folks as I could do with some words of wisdom :wink:

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Mattie
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Post by Mattie » Sun Apr 06, 2008 1:33 pm

If I remember right she is about the same age as Tilly, 19 months old, a teenage hooligan. I have a harness and long line on Tilly all the time and turn everything I can into a training situation. Tilly has to earn the right to go loose, it isn't given to her as a right or because it would be nice to give her some freedom.

Far too many things can happen to a dog that is given freedom before they are ready as you are finding out. I would be furious if a dog ran up to me like that and you would be told, no abusive language though, has more effect without it. :wink:

Would you give a 13 year old the same freedom as a 19 year old? They have to earn their freedom as well. Just because they look mature physically doesn't mean they are mentally.

For the dog, having freedom too early they don't learn how to control themselves, they have no guidance so don't learn how to behave in a well mannered way.

Tilly has a very good recall but I don't let her run free unless I am in a totally enclosed area, she is a teenage hooligan and could decided that she doesn't want to recall but go her own way.

I do know a dog that ran off after another dog, crossed a busy road, was hit by a car and had a broken pelvis that was difficult to heal. His mum went through hell while it was healing because he is a very active dog.
[url=http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v312/Nethertumbleweed/PIXIE.jpg][img]http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v312/Nethertumbleweed/th_PIXIE.jpg[/img][/url]

Ocelot0411
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Post by Ocelot0411 » Mon Apr 07, 2008 4:47 am

Mattie wrote: I would be furious if a dog ran up to me like that and you would be told, no abusive language though, has more effect without it. :wink:
Crumbs, I am shame-faced Mattie :oops: :oops: You are of course right though, its not on. Also Ellie is a big dog now and can be intimidating if you don't know her.

This is food for thought and I will take your comments on board. Perhaps I have given her too much freedom thinking that this was the right thing to do and as such she has learnt that its ok to run riot. Oh dear :oops:

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Mattie
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Post by Mattie » Mon Apr 07, 2008 6:00 am

Sorry if I gave you the impression I was having a go at you, I wasn't, but Joe is terrified of other dogs and can go into a panic attack which leads to a seizure. I have done this myself in the past, making mistakes is how we learn.

Another mistake some owners make is to think if they teach their dog to sit on command in the house, they will do it outside, same as for the recall. Most dogs have a near 100% recall in the house, outside some is about 5% :lol:

Dogs also learn when we manage them because we are very consistant when we manage and the dogs get into the routine. My neighbour had a lovely Collie, she did have an off lead run every afternoon but morning she was on an extending lead and walked on a very quiet country road. Holly only knew the extending lead, she knew how far from her mum she could go without being stopped. When Holly was about 4 I talked her owner to letting her off the lead on this road, Holly behaved the same way as she did on the extending lead. Never went any further in front or behind, on the rare times a vehicle came, she came running back to mum etc.
[url=http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v312/Nethertumbleweed/PIXIE.jpg][img]http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v312/Nethertumbleweed/th_PIXIE.jpg[/img][/url]

Ocelot0411
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Post by Ocelot0411 » Mon Apr 07, 2008 7:53 am

Mattie wrote:Sorry if I gave you the impression I was having a go at you, I wasn't,
No, I didn't take it that way at all Mattie :D. I think I know you well enough now to know that you are not having a go, but just giving me your opinion which is appreciated. its just that when you hear other 'doggie' people say 'no I wouldn't be pleased with that either' it makes you realise that you have allowed bad habits to develop.

I hear what you are saying and take it on board. I think I need to teach Ellie a few more manners when we are out and about. To be honest I think that I have been so pleased to see her come out of her shell and bel ess nervous that she has now gone a bit the other way, but as you say, we learn from our mistakes. Thanks for the advice as always. :D

Carrie
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Post by Carrie » Mon Apr 07, 2008 10:20 am

Great insights from Mattie, as usual. I can't add anything, but thought you might enjoy this article. I think it's excellent.

http://www.clickertraining.com/node/1721
Training with my mind, not my hands.

Ocelot0411
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Joined: Thu May 24, 2007 7:30 am

Post by Ocelot0411 » Mon Apr 07, 2008 11:26 am

Carrie, are you suggesting my dog is crazy!!!!! How DARE you :lol: :lol: :lol: :lol: :lol:

Actually its a fair cop and that thing they say about dogs becoming like their owners is undoubtly true. I am not so stable myself. :wink:

I note that the picture on the article is a Dobie too. Nuff said. ROFL.

Ocelot0411
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Joined: Thu May 24, 2007 7:30 am

Post by Ocelot0411 » Mon Apr 07, 2008 11:39 am

Carrie, I have just read a bit more of that article (i initiallly just saw the 'crazy' thing and laughed!) and its fab. I do love Karen Pryor.

That article is Ellie and is bang on the money about the releasing of energy thing. She displays pretty much all of those behaviours (or has done in the past). Its also very true about the reward side though EVERYTHING is a source of wonderment and huge excitement to Ellie and all I have to do is 'threaten' I might be about to start to play a game and I have her 100% attention.

I am just off to take the crazy pooch for a run with me now and will inwardly digest that article when I get back. Thanks very much for that, that is right up our street. :wink:

Carrie
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Joined: Sun Mar 30, 2008 9:07 am

Post by Carrie » Mon Apr 07, 2008 9:19 pm

As far as suggesting that your dog is crazy, I felt safe in suggesting that since I had a lunatic dog too, when he was young. :lol: Yes, the Doberman on the picture was the perfect example....the epitome of a "crazy" dog. Of course I noticed that. LOL.

It seems to be very common that Dobe owners say the same thing...that they're chalk full of joyful energy, just rarin' to go and willing to do anything you're ready to do.........as long as they get a say in how it's going to play out. 8) They do need to get their opinion in there first. So yes...that playful energy in ourselves....and directing their tasks in a sometimes creative way (or round about way) is so beneficial for some of these dogs. Glad you liked the article. At least I contributed something right. :P
Training with my mind, not my hands.

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