Wait vs. Stay

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horza
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Joined: Sat Jan 15, 2011 5:22 am

Wait vs. Stay

Post by horza » Wed Mar 30, 2011 1:50 pm

just wondering what everyone thought the different was between the "wait" and the "stay" command.

so for example when to use each and what hand signals you use.

i have noticed today that i seem to interchange the word i use but use a flat hand signal, with my palm facing the dog (does that make sense?) for both commands.

just wondering what your thoughts are

thanks

jacksdad
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Re: Wait vs. Stay

Post by jacksdad » Wed Mar 30, 2011 3:25 pm

Technically wait and stay and the accompanying hand signal can be or mean whatever you want them to be. extreme example, you could teach your dog that wait means butt on the floor and sit means don't move from this spot.

However, typically I have seen Stay used to mean don't move from this spot. some people want the dog to stay in that spot in a sit, others are ok with dog shifting from sit to a down back to a sit if the "stay" is being asked over a long period. depends on what you want from your dog. but at the very least stay means don't move from this spot until released.

and for Wait, I have seen it used/explained as do not go forward from this spot. example. I need to step out the front door, but leave it open. I could in theory tell my dog to wait. meaning don't go through the front door. but if he wants to turn away from the open door and go back and wonder around the house, that is ok.

however you chose to use them, make sure they mean something unique to each word. use the same word and hand signal to always mean the same thing. if your are interchanging things it will confuse your dog and weaken what it is you want from your dog.

If you want your dog to STAY as in don't move from this stop. pick a work and hand signal to mean that and only that. same for wait.

if you think the words you currently are using have been ruined, pick new words and start over.

Sarah83
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Re: Wait vs. Stay

Post by Sarah83 » Wed Mar 30, 2011 3:39 pm

I don't use stay. If I put Rupert into a sit or a down then I expect him to stay in that position until released so the stay command is unneccessary. I do use wait though. It basically means stay where you are but I don't care whether you sit, lie down, continue to sniff or whatever. It's kinda vague I suppose but all 3 dogs I've used it with have understood it fine. I don't very often use a hand signal as I mostly use it out on the field when Rupe's up ahead and it's really dark. When I do use it it's my hand with index finger raised.

ladybug1802
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Re: Wait vs. Stay

Post by ladybug1802 » Wed Mar 30, 2011 3:46 pm

I use both....I use 'stay' to mean he sits or stands in that spot and doesnt move till I ask him to. I use 'wait' to ask him to not move from where he is at that moment....for example, if he is ahead of me on a walk (usually he is!¬!!) I use 'wait' to ask him to stay where he is. It is still a work in progress really.....some of the time he does it very well, but other times he stops then shuffles slowly forwards! I also use wait if I want him to hang back if we are going out the door for example, or wait before jumping into the car.

emmabeth
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Re: Wait vs. Stay

Post by emmabeth » Wed Mar 30, 2011 4:40 pm

I use both..

Neither specify a position the dog should be in, merely that the dog should not move, the position is decided first so it may be 'sit. stay' or 'down, stay' or 'sit, wait' etc etc.

For my dogs, 'wait' means 'wait, I may give you another cue', and this can be used when I am with the dog (for example, waiting whilst I open a door or gate and check its all safe, then the cue to proceed is given), or when I am going to go some distance away, or I already am some distance away (for example, have the dog sit, wait, ill walk off then cue the dog to fetch something, or recall to me, or i could send the dog out to a marker, then ask him to wait whilst i throw something, then ask him to fetch it back to me).

Stay means exactly that 'stay there until I return to get you'. This tells my dog that he will not recieve another cue until i am back beside him, all he must do is stay there.

I like to have clarity between the two cues, if I give a wait I want my dog to be paying attention and ready for the next cue - however there are times when I don't awnt my dog to be looking for the next cue, because thats when a dog can pre-empt or misinterpret something you do or say as a cue. I have seen instances where a dog has done this and been so keen and eager for a cue he has dashed across a road and been hit by a car, or jumped a wall with a long drop on the far side.

I cant promise my method rules that sort of accident out entirely, nothing would, but I do think having a distinct cue for 'wait, im going to tell you something else in a minute' and 'stay, switch off, i will come and fetch you' is really useful.
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Nettle
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Re: Wait vs. Stay

Post by Nettle » Thu Mar 31, 2011 2:12 am

With formal training, 'stay' means 'remain where you are and I will return to you'. You never ever call a dog out of a 'stay' - you go back to it, as Emms says.

'Wait' means 'I will give you another command shortly' and is useful for instance if you want to stop a dog at a gate while you go through, and then call the dog through.

Mr. Nettle, a highly intelligent man, cannot make this differentiation :roll: so here we don't use 'stay' at all, only 'wait'. It isn't ideal, but he is untrainable, and I'm not having my dogs confused.

I use an outstretched hand with flat palm towards the dog.
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Sarah83
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Re: Wait vs. Stay

Post by Sarah83 » Thu Mar 31, 2011 3:28 am

Mr. Nettle, a highly intelligent man, cannot make this differentiation :roll: so here we don't use 'stay' at all, only 'wait'. It isn't ideal, but he is untrainable, and I'm not having my dogs confused.
I've had a similar problem with my family and a lot of people at class used the two interchangeably, it's not just Mr Nettle who's untrainable. And Calvin will tell Rupert to stay then leave the room, shut the door behind him and go off to work or to the shop without ever releasing him :roll: So stay means absolutely nothing to Rupert as he's broken it so many times (can't expect him to sit and stay for 4 hours or more because of thoughtless humans). Wait means stop and remain where you are and so far nobody has managed to poison that cue. I think because it's most often used on the field to get him to wait for us to catch up.

doglover27
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Re: Wait vs. Stay

Post by doglover27 » Thu Mar 31, 2011 11:07 am

For my pup, wait is short term and stay is longer term. I tell him SIT then WAIT, open the car door, and then say OK to let him know he can now get into the car. SIT, WAIT, open front door of house. OK, now you can go out. SIT, WAIT. Now I am going to pull the car down the driveway and I don't want you running alongside the vehicle. OK, I am at the end of the driveway, you may get up now. STAY is a bit longer term. I also use WAIT when playing fetch. SIT, WAIT, throw stick, OK, go get it!
I don't use STAY as often as WAIT. I think WAIT is use when he can see me and I am right there. He knows he will soon be released from it or given another command. STAY is when he sometimes can't see me, like when I go around the corner momentarily, go into the gas station to pay for gas, etc. He knows I will return, but he must STAY there until I do. Either that or he just can't see me and he must STAY there til I return to release him. Does that make any sense?

horza
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Joined: Sat Jan 15, 2011 5:22 am

Re: Wait vs. Stay

Post by horza » Thu Mar 31, 2011 11:23 am

Thanks for your responses,

i think im going to stick to just using "wait", this is what i use when walking and when playing the "find it" game.

i just caught myself saying "stay" for her food, and just wondered, but will ensure I (and hopefully everyine else) only use "wait"

Thanks

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