Collies, rough and smooth!

Breed specific discussion of your favorite breed.

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thepennywhistle
Posts: 669
Joined: Thu Feb 18, 2010 4:20 pm

Collies, rough and smooth!

Post by thepennywhistle » Wed Mar 17, 2010 2:01 pm

Collies, rough and smooth!
by thepennywhistle » Tue Mar 16, 2010 1:38 pm

Hi all,

I have collies, have had collies for about 20 years now. Tried showing, found I wasn't competetive enough,
though my dog was good. Tried breeding. Bred 1 litter, was overwhelmed by trying to see all the puppies
into safe homes, and even then I found one in the pound, though the contract specified they'd give her back
if they had to give her up. Moved into collie rescue and helping the collies that really needed an extra bit of
luck and love. This is my spot with my breed

I think collies are just super dogs. Come in two coats, the big fluffy rough collie, and the short-haired smooth.
They're just the same, but the roughs have more hair. Gentle, so very smart, easy to work with and train to
do anything you want, and I don't have to worry about them being too eager to use their mouths. I had GSDs
before collies, and I still adore the breed, but I always had this worry about someone crossing a line with my
dog and getting bitten. Collies only protect me, not the property, though they will let me know about anything
I need to know, such as a neighbor kid's pot party in the back field at 2 a.m., or the space shuttle launch
streaking over the front field. I was scrubbing water buckets and would have missed a beautiful, memorable
site, but for Cas and his woof. "Woof," said Cassidy. One woof, and then I could follow where his collie needle
nose was pointing. He never gave a false alarm, and I learned never to disregard that woof. His big quirk was
chasing helicopters off the property as they flew overhead. Hey, they always flew away after he told them to :lol:

Cassidy was also devoted to unweaned kitten rescue. He was the biggest nana dog. It ended up that I would
do the feeding, but he took care of everything else -- all the washing, the comforting, letting them sleep
curled up in his coat, or play king of the hill on top of him. If he felt his kittens were being threatened by
something, such as other dogs playing, he'd pick them up and relocate them. One kitten was so special to
him that he hid him from adopters that came to meet him, and when Tigger came bouncing out of hiding
to mee them, Cas tried to block them from reaching him. The look of heartbreak he gave me when he
realized it wasn't going to work nearly made me cry. I had to let him keep Tigger.

The collies always helped me with the horses, moving them in or out for me, helping me feed. One rescue,
MacLeod, was absolutely determined to stay glued to my side while I slept in the stable during foal watch.
Knowing what moved about in the dark, I was rather grateful. Unfortunately, in protecting me one night,
he and the others barked a possum to death. Just stood around it and barked, but I guess they scared it
to death. That's a collie. Protective, but no more force than necessary. At one point a hurricaine (a small one)
passed directly over my farm. I had to go out and feed the horses, make sure the stable was still standing in
the wind, etc. The rain and wind was so bad I got lost on my own property between house and stable as I was
trying to make it back to the house. Two of the collies came out into that storm with me. Never left my side
while working with the horses, but when we headed back to the house they wasted no time in running ahead of
me. I got turned around with the wind and rain in my face and didn't follow them. When they realized I was
going the wrong way and out into the field, they came back ut into the storm to redirect me and show me the
way back.

The rescue collies are always sad, always confused, but rarely at fault for losing their home. My vet once
said of them, looking at the most recent shelter pull, "You know, when you bring these dogs in, it's never
a dog problem. It's always a people problem." Not always, but he was pretty close. Some provided memorable
experiences and some dogs gave me surprises, but they were always good dogs, like Lassie, who came to
me at age 10 years, found dumped on a highway. She never stopped searching for her car, or her children.
She adored children. Any child. Would cry and wave to children, begging for hugs. In PetsMart I watched a
mom let a toddler, new to walking and wobbly, head for her with mom's encouraging "go see the doggie."
Not a good move with a strange dog, but there was no risk with Lassie. She grinned, wagged madly, gave
that high whine of joy, and threw herself to the floor with an audible thump, then flattened small and still
to let that child crawl all over her. I think that was the happiest I ever saw her. Then there was James, an
old man who was dumped in a kill shelter at age 8 because his family was moving. He went to heal the
broken heart of a little girl whose last dog gave chase to something while on a leash and towed them both
into the path of a truck. Dog was killed. Girl was scraped up and traumatized. James was quiet, dignified,
patient, wanted hugs and tea parties, and would NEVER endanger that child. And he had the funniest
trick -- if you asked him "Where's Timmy? Is Timmy in the well?" He would go into this barking, capering
dance that made everyone laugh. There was Chance, nearly starved to death and abused, and while still
new to having food again was so overwhelmed by the smell of hamburgers that he tried to climb through
Wendy's drive-through window. Got the front end inside with one lunge, with one hind foot on the horn and
the other wedged in my bra. Poor traumatized boy, he was so embarrassed once he realized what he'd done.
Fortunately the employees understood. They gave him his own Kid's Meal. And then there was funny Kayley,
whose favorite napping spot was on top of the washing machine. Never figured that one out.

Collies are all different, but all amazing in their own way. And while they aren't Lassie right out of the box,
they all have the potential to be a Lassie. My personal feeling is that you can't go wrong with a collie

Skye and the white merle collies

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itsbeth
Posts: 17
Joined: Sun Apr 18, 2010 12:47 am

Re: Collies, rough and smooth!

Post by itsbeth » Sun Apr 18, 2010 2:01 am

My childhood dog was a collie and was a wonderfully sweet, beautiful dog. I guess they're something of a tradition in my family, as both my parents had collies growing up too. They'll always have a special place in my heart, and if I have the chance to share my life with another some day, it will be a rescue for sure! (Um, maybe a smooth, since my current double-coated, long-haired mutt has me coughing up hairballs. :lol: ) Thank you for the work you do!
thepennywhistle wrote:And he had the funniest
trick -- if you asked him "Where's Timmy? Is Timmy in the well?" He would go into this barking, capering
dance that made everyone laugh.
That is absolutely hilarious! :lol:

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itsbeth
Posts: 17
Joined: Sun Apr 18, 2010 12:47 am

Re: Collies, rough and smooth!

Post by itsbeth » Sun Apr 18, 2010 2:01 am

itsbeth wrote:My childhood dog was a collie and was a wonderfully sweet, beautiful dog. I guess they're something of a tradition in my family, as both my parents had collies growing up too. They'll always have a special place in my heart, and if I have the chance to share my life with another some day, it will be a rescue for sure! (Um, maybe a smooth, since my current double-coated, long-haired mutt has me coughing up hairballs.) Thank you for the work you do!
thepennywhistle wrote:And he had the funniest
trick -- if you asked him "Where's Timmy? Is Timmy in the well?" He would go into this barking, capering
dance that made everyone laugh.
That is absolutely hilarious! :lol:

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itsbeth
Posts: 17
Joined: Sun Apr 18, 2010 12:47 am

Re: Collies, rough and smooth!

Post by itsbeth » Sun Apr 18, 2010 2:02 am

Sorry, thought I clicked edit, but there is no edit! :oops:

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Mattie
Posts: 5872
Joined: Tue Jan 09, 2007 5:21 am

Re: Collies, rough and smooth!

Post by Mattie » Sun Apr 18, 2010 3:53 am

I grew up with farm Collies, these were wonderful dogs just as you described, unfortunately most Collies today are not like this, many are nervous and hyperactive,not suitable for a family home.

As a child I trusted Collies, I knew I was safe with them even the Collies I didn't know, not today, I don't trust strange Collies, have been bitten by too many of the over the last 20 years. I have a Collie/Lab, she is more Collie in personality than the Lab, but she will nip if given the chance, I try not to give her this chance.

When I adopted Bonnie I had my husband to care for, he had a stroke and couldn't do anything for himself so I didn't have the time to give a Collie what she needed. Hubby saw Bonnie on the internet and wanted her, I phoned the rescue to ask if she had Collie in her, was told "No", so off we all go, the rescue was 70n miles away, hubby and 3 dogs. I was busy watching my other dogs and making sure hubby was ok so didn't really take a good look at Bonnie, just saw a black dog. Hubby wanted her so she came home with us.

When I got her home the penny dropped, she was half Collie, panic stations, how was I going to give her the exercise she needed. I phoned the rescue and asked why I was told she didn't have any Collie in her and was told "You wouldn't have taken her if I had", what a way to run a rescue. With this attitude I couldn't let Bonnie go back so had to learn how to cope. She had so much energy she was bouncing off the walls.

Nearly 5 years on, hubby is now at the Bridge with our dogs that are there, Bonnie has settled down and is a wonderful little girl who loves to talk to me, I don't regret adopting Bonnie but there were many times when I couldn't give her the exercise that she needed, thankfully she will play with a ball, someone had taught her to run round with a ball in her mouth when the word "Fetch" was used, this was her lifesaver, me standing saying "Fetch", and Bonnie running round the garden with a ball in her mouth.

Collies should only go to homes were the owners have the time, energy and love walking, when working sheep they can cover over 50 miles a day on the side of mountains.
[url=http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v312/Nethertumbleweed/PIXIE.jpg][img]http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v312/Nethertumbleweed/th_PIXIE.jpg[/img][/url]

luvmydogs
Posts: 94
Joined: Mon Feb 22, 2010 8:00 am

Re: Collies, rough and smooth!

Post by luvmydogs » Sun Apr 18, 2010 6:50 am

When I was around 8 years old my family went to visit my cousins in Texas..They had a beautiful collie named Guy..I went for a walk with him in the neighborhood and got lost..After walking around for awhile with him right by me I told him to go home..Just like in the Lassie movies he turned around and started walking but when he was around 10 feet away he turned and barked...It was so cool..I followed him home which was totally not in the direction I had been going...Collies are a great breed with a big heart...

macmomo8
Posts: 8
Joined: Thu Jan 13, 2011 6:09 pm

Re: Collies, rough and smooth!

Post by macmomo8 » Wed Jan 19, 2011 8:18 pm

Awwwwwww. So sweet. Can any y'all tell me about how big a full grown rough coated collie gets? (not shelties!!!)

JKMika
Posts: 2
Joined: Sun Feb 12, 2017 4:07 pm

Re: Collies, rough and smooth!

Post by JKMika » Sun Feb 12, 2017 4:35 pm

About those 'old farm' collies... do you think it would be possible to find one today? I'd love to get a dog like that for my son.
(Although I'm not quite sure what age he must be before we welcome a collie puppy into our home. 3? 4?)

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