So you think you want a Giant schnauzer?

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ZaraD
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So you think you want a Giant schnauzer?

Post by ZaraD » Sun May 06, 2018 7:10 am

Hi all

As there is already loads of info on the GSD I thought I would do a post on the Giant Schnauzer incase anyone else who came on here could read this and hopefully help in there decision on if the Giant Schnauzer is right for them. Also experts like Nettle, Emmabeth are free to add anything I miss or any other content that might help.

So I'll start by talking about the Giant schnauzer ( keep in mind i only own one he's my current and first Giant schnauzer but definitely won't be my last as I'm now converted to the breed)

You think you want a Giant Schnauzer:

The Giant Schnauzer is an extremely intelligent, large, energetic, strongly territorial dog whose life is oriented totally toward his owners. If he is the right dog for you, he is one of the most rewarding breeds to own, but, remember, this is also a demanding breed, and SHOULD NOT be casually added to a household. It is not the breed for everyone. It is not the right breed for every household.

Will you enjoy owning a Giant Schnauzer? If you are looking for a bright, sensitive, responsive dog with whom you will be able to spend time, whom you will enjoy grooming, whom you plan to obedience train; if you are looking for a protective, loyal dog who will be devoted to you and your family for the rest of his life -- then PERHAPS you would enjoy owning a Giant and MAYBE, the breed is right for your family. No one can describe a dog completely-in words. When you get to know a member of any breed, your personalities will either click or they won't. And, that's what you're looking for: a breed you can spontaneously enjoy. Nevertheless, a word picture can indicate whether or not the Giant-Schnauzer is a breed you would like to know more about.

The Giant Schnauzer is a guard dog. He feels that one of his jobs is to protect his family and home. You don't need to train him to do this; his guard instincts come naturally to him. He will be watchful of people on your property, expressing caution and suspicion, Giants take life seriously. They aren't happy-go-lucky types of dogs who will go wagging up to everyone. However, a Giant quickly learns to differentiate between strangers and the friends or relatives-who visit your home frequently, greeting the latter folks graciously once in your home. As a guard dog, the Giant, has a strong sense of his territory: this means they are not usually roamers, but it does not mean, nor is it an excuse to let them run loose. And, you shouldn't expect your male Giant to get along with or even tolerate any other male dog.

A Giant Schnauzer is a sensitive dog who is always aware of your moods. You will sometimes find him lying quietly, just watching you. The Giant wants to be physically near you; he wants his life to be involved with yours as much as possible. Some people find this intelligent dependence oppressive, while others will find this on highly rewarding.

Giant Schnauzers need lots of exercise. Do you personally, like to go for long walks or jog daily? Do you possibly have another large dog with whom your Giant can roughhouse? In the past, have you enjoyed playing energetically with your dogs? You'll be happier, and so will your dog, if you choose a breed that fits into your present lifestyle, rather than expect to change your way of life because you've acquired a dog. You may, if you choose the wrong breed, come to resent the dog.

Also, on the subject of exercise: don't plan on shoving your Giant (or any other breed) out the door or allow him to exercise by running around the town or countryside. No dog should be allowed to run loose unsupervised, but this is specifically true for large dogs, who are intimidating to some people, who are very efficient at tearing trash bags full of garbage apart, and who can damage livestock or wildlife --- you will be held responsible for the damage your dog does. Not only this, but Giants, usually, are not afraid of cars. Just think how you would feel if he were killed. For your dogs safety and your neighbors' peace of mind, fence your yard BEFORE you bring your puppy home.

Giant Schnauzers need regular grooming, so plan to put some time aside for this. They do not shed in great tufts, but this does not mean that hairs don't loosen and if loosened, dead hairs stay in the coat too long impeding the growth of a healthy, hard new coat. The Giants that you see at the shows and in photographs just didn't come that way: hours and hours of time went into grooming and preparing them. Visually, the area most affected by grooming is the dog's head. If you don't keep your dog's head trimmed and neat, his beautifully expressive face will disappear under a mass of hair. Grooming the whole dog is important for the health of his skin, for removing burrs, and for keeping him clean. Grooming isn't an extra -- it has to be done, Whether you do it yourself or pay someone else, regular grooming is essential to your dog's health and to your enjoyment of your dog.

The Giant Schnauzer is a working dog. The working dog group includes some of the most intelligent breeds of dogs. If you have never owned a Giant before, you'll be amazed at how quickly he learns, and at the number of things you can teach him. But this intelligence carries an obligation with it. A Giant won't be happy left alone in a pen or in your house all day. A working dog enjoys life most when he is given responsibility and a job to do, The Giant Schnauzer is a dog who must be trained and worked with regularity. He demands your attention and thrives on it, and will reward you many times over for the time you spend training him. But once again, think and look at your lifestyle.

Don't buy a Giant Schnauzer because of pictures you've seen of them, or what you've read about them. Don't even base your decision on what the devotees of the breed tell you about them. MEET THE DOGS. Watch them at shows, but more important see them at home. Adult Giants will act differently toward you than they do their owners, because they are very loyal and protective, rather than extroverted, sociable types. Nevertheless, if you spend some time with a Giant Schnauzer and his owner, you'll begin to get the an idea of what a Giant is like to live with. Ask to watch as the Giant is groomed. Watch an obedience training session, either a practice session at home or a formal class. Take your time. Ask questions! Visit as many breeders as you can. THINK! Get to know the breed. It the only way to find out if a Giant Schnauzer is the right dog for you.

Now a quick word to those who are complete first time owners , I know Nettle may or may not agree here but I'm basing this on my experience and those who have also had giants first and been successful like me.

For first time dog owners:

Since the Giant is a unique breed with characteristics all of its own, it frankly doesn't make much difference whether it is a first or tenth dog, with the proviso that I wouldn't recommend starting out with a male, because girls are definitely raised in this breed iv spent a lot of time around both females and males since owning Sampson and the girls have been easier to those who own them, but also Owning a fairly placid breed like a Lab would NOT prepare anyone for a Giant!

What matters is that the new owner has a) thoroughly researched the breed so they fully understand what they are taking on by this I mean not just getting to know the giant but also understanding dog behaviour , learning all about positive training and getting one to one help from a good behaviourist to help from day one the Giant is no Labrador, and b) the confidence and time to commit to raising a powerful, highly intelligent, sometimes stubborn, demanding clown of a dog.

If you can't do A then please don't get a Giant.

Also since I also own a GSD to understand in a more simpler term the Giant is 10x more challenging than a GSD. Being a first time owner in my opinion does not mean you can't have a Giant as your first dog as it can be done apart from myself I know loads of people who have owned a Giant first who have succeeded but it's no picnic in the park and certainly not as easy as say a Labrador but again it can be done but as said above a lab also won't prepare you for a Giant.

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Erica
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Re: So you think you want a Giant schnauzer?

Post by Erica » Mon May 07, 2018 10:07 pm

Hi Zara,

Could you properly source this article? We don't need MLA format, but at least a link is nice if you are reposting someone else's work. :)
Delta, standard poodle, born 6/30/14

ZaraD
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Location: Staffordshire, UK

Re: So you think you want a Giant schnauzer?

Post by ZaraD » Tue May 08, 2018 2:54 am

Sorry Erica I completely forgot to add the link, I copied and pasted as I wanted to add a few things from my experience and change a few things as the article refers to dominate and on here we don't agree with dominance.


Here's the link http://www.schnauzer-scapmans.com/schnauzer-raceuk1.htm apart from a few thing I did agree with most of it is very well written and explains what it's like living with one of these dogs perfectly.

ZaraD
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Location: Staffordshire, UK

Re: So you think you want a Giant schnauzer?

Post by ZaraD » Tue May 08, 2018 11:10 am

Forgot to say, that the best way to sum up a Giant schnauzer is that they are about the same hard work as a Working line GSD and just as intense too, as Sampson is a lot harder that Lara but Lara is a showline GSD.

Intense is a word I would use to describe a Giant schnauzer

Lara is a lot easier as she's a lot more laid back she's happy to get her mental exercise from games in the garden and puzzle toys but Sampson needs a lot more like I do tracking with him and competitive obedience as brain games don't cut it with Sampson.

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Erica
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Re: So you think you want a Giant schnauzer?

Post by Erica » Wed May 09, 2018 8:45 pm

Do you have experience with true working line GSDs? Having met a handful at the working dog conference, that kind of intensity doesn't just happen if you aren't breeding for it, and I haven't heard schnauzer owners saying their dogs are anything like a working line dog.
Delta, standard poodle, born 6/30/14

ZaraD
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Re: So you think you want a Giant schnauzer?

Post by ZaraD » Thu May 10, 2018 1:13 am

I have met a few working line GSD who have been about the same intensity mentally.

Most of the giant schnauzer people I know have all agreed.

I found this also saying the same. http://www.schnauzer-forum.co.uk/viewto ... mobile=off

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Nettle
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Re: So you think you want a Giant schnauzer?

Post by Nettle » Thu May 10, 2018 3:58 am

An important factor in any breed is how the training is conducted. Many of the older disciplines, such a schutzhund and certain types of competitive obedience are often still favouring dominance ideas and forceful training. These methods bring out resistance in the dog, and boy! can some breeds be resistant. Those same breeds, those same dogs, would respond far better to reward-based training. They would still present character differences, there would still be setbacks and the need to think around an issue, but if we don't press the wrong buttons, we don't get dogs that are "stubborn" or "defiant".

All breeds and types present challenges. Training is an art as well as a science. Learning to drive in a Ferrari can get expensive.
A dog is never bad or naughty - it is simply being a dog

SET YOURSELF UP FOR SUCCESS

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Erica
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Re: So you think you want a Giant schnauzer?

Post by Erica » Sat May 12, 2018 9:34 pm

We don't get many giant schnauzers around here, but the trainers I've talked to that have worked with them do not agree that schnauz are "ten times more intense" than GSDs. Maybe it's a regional difference as I'm talking to trainers mostly over the US rather than the UK. :)
Delta, standard poodle, born 6/30/14

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