Is there any truth to it?

Breed specific discussion of your favorite breed.

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ZaraD
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Is there any truth to it?

Post by ZaraD » Thu Feb 15, 2018 10:26 am

Hi all

Thought I'd get your opinion Von something as a few of my employers have told me the number one thing they keep getting asked is what breeds are good for first time owners and there all unsure of what to say so I wanna get an opinion so they now what to say in future.

So is it true first of all that for the average first time owner some breeds are better choices than others?

In my opinion it all depends on the owner of they have little or no hands on experience than yes they should go for a more easier breed as they can have all the knowledge in the world but that won't prepare them for the real shock of dog ownership.in other words as much as I love Sampson his breed the giant schnauzer and other guarding breeds like dobermans, mastiffs, GSD in my opinion are not suited to people who have only read books and nothing else no matter how committed they are as the books don't tell you everything.

But if the first time owner has done more than just read books has also met many examples of the breed and has gained hands on experience and is going to get help from day one I think that nearly any breed can be suited.

But the question my employers get asked is which breeds are better for first time owners?

Now if they don't have any experience than these would be my recommendations and I just want to see if you agree. By the way I would advise them to research any of the below very carefully to find the one who suits there lifestyle and energy. But I just want you to tell me if you agree these breeds are good matches for the average first time owner.


Small dogs:
My number one choice would be Cavalier king Charles spaniel
Havanese
Papillon
Mini schnauzer
Mini and toy poodle
Boston terrier

Medium dogs:
Whippet
Welsh Springer spaniel
English Springer Spaniel (for very active family's)

Large:
Golden retriever (my number one choice)
Labrador retriever
Flat coat retriever
Rough collie
Standard poodle
Greyhound
Italian spinion
Dalmatian ( only if there going to really research and only if they match a dals energy levels)

These are the breeds I would say make good choices for first time owners do you agree?
What would you suggest?

P.s I'm not basing this on health, excersice ect... As in would advise that they have to research that them sleds to see which one best matches them.

Just want to get advice so we can give good advice in the future as we can help people pick the right breeds.

ZaraD
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Re: Is there any truth to it?

Post by ZaraD » Thu Feb 15, 2018 11:22 am

Breeds I would not recommend to the average first time owner:
German shepherd dog
Giant schnauzer
Schnauzer
Rottweiler
Mastiff breeds
Akita
Chow chow
Alaskan malamutes
Doberman
Some terriers and bull breeds
Giant breeds
Some patrol breeds
And other guarding breeds

Iv had a few people ask what Sampson is and you'd be surprised how many believe he's a Irish wolfhound cross :roll: :lol: , then they ask are giants good first dog, my reply yes for me but I'd been around a lot of dog's and worked with dogs since i was 19yrs old. So I had lots of experience before taking him on but for the average first time owner no there far from easy to those who have never had a dog before or who have no experience.

Lotsaquestions
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Re: Is there any truth to it?

Post by Lotsaquestions » Thu Feb 15, 2018 12:41 pm

I don't think Papillons or Dalmations are 'good' first time dogs (in that they are recommended for complete novices who aren't into training).

Dalmations can have quite a high guard drive with some animal aggressive tendancies bred into them, and Papillons are little dynamo's with all the 'issues' that can come with high spirited, sensitive smart dogs.

Lots of bully breeds are really 'simple' to look after. Staffies & boxers for example don't really have any extremes that make them hard for first time dog owners. Staffies especially can be very rock solid in temperament.

Also some giant breeds are amazing first time dogs - newfie for example. Rock solid temperament and many are pretty gentle.

I take 'good for first time dog owners' with a pinch of salt really because it does all depend on what type of first time dog owner you are. If you've never owned a dog before but are going to be taking part in training classes, doggy sports etc: then you're going to be able to handle different dogs to a first time dog owner who just wants something to cuddle in the evenings.

ZaraD
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Re: Is there any truth to it?

Post by ZaraD » Thu Feb 15, 2018 12:54 pm

Lotsaquestions wrote:
Thu Feb 15, 2018 12:41 pm
I don't think Papillons or Dalmations are 'good' first time dogs (in that they are recommended for complete novices who aren't into training).

Dalmations can have quite a high guard drive with some animal aggressive tendancies bred into them, and Papillons are little dynamo's with all the 'issues' that can come with high spirited, sensitive smart dogs.

Lots of bully breeds are really 'simple' to look after. Staffies & boxers for example don't really have any extremes that make them hard for first time dog owners. Staffies especially can be very rock solid in temperament.

Also some giant breeds are amazing first time dogs - newfie for example. Rock solid temperament and many are pretty gentle.



I take 'good for first time dog owners' with a pinch of salt really because it does all depend on what type of first time dog owner you are. If you've never owned a dog before but are going to be taking part in training classes, doggy sports etc: then you're going to be able to handle different dogs to a first time dog owner who just wants something to cuddle in the evenings.
Thanks lotsaquestions , very interesting all the Papillon if know have been very easy dogs, so interesting, like you I'm very interested in different breeds so am a bit of a nerd when it comes to breeds :lol:

I did think should I put Dalmatian on. So I think I will take them off along with Papillon as I want to give my employers a list to recommend for the complete newbie on Saturday when I go in.

I was surprised you said giants like Newfies , I do agree with you and after meeting a leonberger I would say they could be good first dogs but I read this a while ago which made me then think maybe not as someone asked on here about giants including newfs and was told there not for first time owner so might interest you. https://positively.com/forum/viewtopic.php?f=23&t=21945

Staffies if still not met a good one yet by good I mean one who's owner is not a thug and has trained it to be agressive all the ones I've met have been trained to fight :twisted: :roll: , if never had the pleasure of meeting a true staffie

Boxers if not had much experience with as there not very popular in my area. I thought they would be hard for a newbie considering they were bred to guard?

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JudyN
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Re: Is there any truth to it?

Post by JudyN » Thu Feb 15, 2018 12:54 pm

I second LoQ's thoughts on staffies - given you know enough about their background or individual temperament of course, as some of these dogs are dreadfully abused.

I sometimes wonder if second dogs could be more challenging than first dogs as with your first dog you can be more open-minded and have fewer expectations. If your first dog is a staffie or a lab and your second dog is a saluki or greyhound you really can mess them up if you don't realise just how different they are.
Jasper, lurcher, born December 2009

ZaraD
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Re: Is there any truth to it?

Post by ZaraD » Thu Feb 15, 2018 1:01 pm

JudyN wrote:
Thu Feb 15, 2018 12:54 pm
I second LoQ's thoughts on staffies - given you know enough about their background or individual temperament of course, as some of these dogs are dreadfully abused.

I sometimes wonder if second dogs could be more challenging than first dogs as with your first dog you can be more open-minded and have fewer expectations. If your first dog is a staffie or a lab and your second dog is a saluki or greyhound you really can mess them up if you don't realise just how different they are.
Very interesting Judy , I think sometimes we can forget that every dog we own we should go into with a open mind.

What about giants Judy? What are your thoughts?

Lotsaquestions
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Re: Is there any truth to it?

Post by Lotsaquestions » Thu Feb 15, 2018 1:09 pm

Staffies are one of the most easy going dogs me and Merlin come across. They are either really tolerant of his teenage craziness, or totally bonkers themselves and join in the game. However I am guilty of 'looking at the owner' first, and if they are the young 'hard man' type I avoid. Very level headed dogs, and its really hard to 'push their buttons' into reacting. I've heard of male-male aggression in them, but never experienced it (Merlin has mingled with intact staffies before when he was intact).

Papillons are lovely dogs, but being really smart and sensitive you can 'mess up' alot quicker than with a bomb proof dog. Not to mention they need as much mental stimultion as collies to avoid having behavioural issues down to boredom, which most owners won't have the time / energy to do.

That thread suggests dogs with the size and strength of giant breeds can be an issue, and I totally agree, especially when they're teens! Temperament wise though I've not met a highly strung Newfie.

I don't think I've met a boxer with a mean bone in its body unless it was an undersocialised adolescent. They live to play and are big dopes.

ZaraD
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Re: Is there any truth to it?

Post by ZaraD » Thu Feb 15, 2018 1:20 pm

Lotsaquestions wrote:
Thu Feb 15, 2018 1:09 pm
Staffies are one of the most easy going dogs me and Merlin come across. They are either really tolerant of his teenage craziness, or totally bonkers themselves and join in the game. However I am guilty of 'looking at the owner' first, and if they are the young 'hard man' type I avoid. Very level headed dogs, and its really hard to 'push their buttons' into reacting. I've heard of male-male aggression in them, but never experienced it (Merlin has mingled with intact staffies before when he was intact).

Papillons are lovely dogs, but being really smart and sensitive you can 'mess up' alot quicker than with a bomb proof dog. Not to mention they need as much mental stimultion as collies to avoid having behavioural issues down to boredom, which most owners won't have the time / energy to do.

That thread suggests dogs with the size and strength of giant breeds can be an issue, and I totally agree, especially when they're teens! Temperament wise though I've not met a highly strung Newfie.

I don't think I've met a boxer with a mean bone in its body unless it was an undersocialised adolescent. They live to play and are big dopes.
I'd love to meet more boxers so there like Labradors then big goofballs :lol: ? I always thought they were hyper?

And with giants as long as the owners believe the can truly handle a dog of that size then newfs and leons can be good for first time owners?

I'm going to put the staffie on the list.

Lotsaquestions
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Re: Is there any truth to it?

Post by Lotsaquestions » Thu Feb 15, 2018 1:24 pm

Boxers definately need exercise! They are total goofballs 24/7 in my experience, but their temperament is happy and pleasant to be around (as long as you like playful dogs!)

ZaraD
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Re: Is there any truth to it?

Post by ZaraD » Thu Feb 15, 2018 1:28 pm

Lotsaquestions wrote:
Thu Feb 15, 2018 1:24 pm
Boxers definately need exercise! They are total goofballs 24/7 in my experience, but their temperament is happy and pleasant to be around (as long as you like playful dogs!)
Ok so boxers would suit those who plan on playing loads with there dog and who can provide more than 2hrs of exercise a day?

And am I right that giants are a good choice only if you can handle a 60kg+ dog?

Lotsaquestions
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Re: Is there any truth to it?

Post by Lotsaquestions » Thu Feb 15, 2018 1:36 pm

Yes boxers need a good amount of exercise, not entirely sure exactly how much. I would say they are less demanding of it than working springers.

I personally don't see why giant breeds are an issue with first time owners as long as they are fully aware this will be a big dog. The only issue I've ever had with a giant breed (absolutely gigantic teenage english sheepdog) is the owner just let it bounce all over people and other dogs far smaller than itself. It leapt up on my OH multiple times, bounced all over Merlin who ran to the safety of a passing German Shepherd who was able to handle the sheepdog, typical teenage stuff but its size meant it could be dangerous rather than annoying. Other than that, and having to carry around triple xl poo bags, I can't see them being harder to handle temperament notwithstanding.

Having said that I've never owned a giant breed so I'm not best placed to comment. I've only met them out and about.

ZaraD
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Re: Is there any truth to it?

Post by ZaraD » Thu Feb 15, 2018 1:41 pm

Lotsaquestions wrote:
Thu Feb 15, 2018 1:36 pm
Yes boxers need a good amount of exercise, not entirely sure exactly how much. I would say they are less demanding of it than working springers.

I personally don't see why giant breeds are an issue with first time owners as long as they are fully aware this will be a big dog. The only issue I've ever had with a giant breed (absolutely gigantic teenage english sheepdog) is the owner just let it bounce all over people and other dogs far smaller than itself. It leapt up on my OH multiple times, bounced all over Merlin who ran to the safety of a passing German Shepherd who was able to handle the sheepdog, typical teenage stuff but its size meant it could be dangerous rather than annoying. Other than that, and having to carry around triple xl poo bags, I can't see them being harder to handle temperament notwithstanding.

Having said that I've never owned a giant breed so I'm not best placed to comment. I've only met them out and about.
Iv met hundreds of newfs and one leonberger and all of them including my sisters leonberger has been soooooooo laid back and chilled and very gentle so I can't see an issue either, I think as you say as long as they know realistically how big the dog will be and train it right from the start when it's still small then I can't see an issue. I'd love a newf but I can't stand drool , all the times of groomed a newf and I kept gagging , I have a very bad gag reflex ( I think that's what ya call it) :lol: .

Leons are beautiful though and don't drool.

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JudyN
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Re: Is there any truth to it?

Post by JudyN » Thu Feb 15, 2018 2:22 pm

I can't really comment on giant breeds because though Jasper is tall and I've got the strength of a malnourished sparrow, he really isn't a puller - he's very respectful of the collar, which I'm sure is as much down to his nature as it is to training. At his most desperate to get ahead, I can hold him as long as I stand still, but I can't slowly walk forward when he wants to run forward at 40mph. I could drag him in the other direction though :wink:

Some dogs are such natural pullers that they won't even realise that you're still attached as they drag you through the mud :lol:
Jasper, lurcher, born December 2009

ZaraD
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Re: Is there any truth to it?

Post by ZaraD » Thu Feb 15, 2018 2:33 pm

JudyN wrote:
Thu Feb 15, 2018 2:22 pm
I can't really comment on giant breeds because though Jasper is tall and I've got the strength of a malnourished sparrow, he really isn't a puller - he's very respectful of the collar, which I'm sure is as much down to his nature as it is to training. At his most desperate to get ahead, I can hold him as long as I stand still, but I can't slowly walk forward when he wants to run forward at 40mph. I could drag him in the other direction though :wink:

Some dogs are such natural pullers that they won't even realise that you're still attached as they drag you through the mud :lol:
All the newfs if met have never pulled not one but I suppose it's because there owners knew excatly how big and powerful these dogs were gonna be and put lots of effort into training lead manners.

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Shalista
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Re: Is there any truth to it?

Post by Shalista » Thu Feb 15, 2018 5:35 pm

curious about you guys recommending staffies. seeing baxs terrier nature i dont think id ever want to see a bigger version of bax (IE a large terrier) :shock: :shock: :shock:
Baxter (AKA Bax, Chuckles, Chuckster) Rat Terrier, born 01/16/13

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