Advice needed one last time?

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ZaraD
Posts:577
Joined:Sat Feb 04, 2017 10:06 am
Location:Staffordshire, UK
Advice needed one last time?

Post by ZaraD » Fri Nov 03, 2017 3:03 am

Hi all

Ok so as you know you all helped me pick the golden retriever as my first dog.

Well there has been a change in circumstances my mom ( I have tow my birth mom who does not have any dogs and my step mom who is the one who owns the terriers, but I just call her mom as well) anyway my birth mom has come to live with me as she was finding it hard to live on her own so I suggest she lives with me as I have a big three bed house to myself and she has. She suffers with arthritis in her shoulders, both knees , feet and hands.

She is really excited at getting a dog as she has always wanted to get one. But I'm now questioning if a Golden would suit my mom as goldens are big active dogs and even though I'm active my mom is not. And I want to get a dog that is suited to my mom as well.

I wondering if a golden might be to much for my mom because of her arthritis.

Can a golden still be ok for someone with arthritis?

I'm hoping someone can help, as I don't know what to do my mom really likes the golden she's just worried if it's a hyper breed?

Lotsaquestions
Posts:646
Joined:Wed Aug 23, 2017 6:06 am

Re: Advice needed one last time?

Post by Lotsaquestions » Fri Nov 03, 2017 6:44 am

I've met plenty of goldens young and old. I wouldn't call them hyper at all, and they do seem to be alot more mellow than a lab, but as teenagers they are crocodiles and think its great to jump up and mouth and mug for food. Obviously this is a training / age issue, but there will probably be a point in the dogs life where it will jump up and try to bowl over your mom and be very demanding for attention. If you're mom is left on her own to take care of a young, bouncy teenage butthead of a golden then you would probably have to make sure the dog is thoroughly exhausted before hand and have a stash of frozen kongs ready!

But these dogs can make great therapy / assistance dogs for a reason, so eventually with proper training and finding the right breeder (show line or assistance dog lines perhaps?) you'll end up with a fab dog that your mom could handle so long as one of you is willing to give it the exercise and stimulation it needs to remain mellow.

Having said that there are plenty of small / medium dogs that have a similar sort of personality, but are easier to manage. Coton de tulear for example are happy, biddable, playful little things. A Papillon even, they are full of beans and need as much stimulation as a golden so would fit you being active, but they're small and easy to handle for someone with health issues. I would recommend the larger size of Paps though (11inches at the shoulder) as the smaller are quite frail.

Just to add, I think you're in the UK right? Well I've been following this blog for quite a while now of a woman who is trying to breed healthy Cavalier type dogs by mixing in a bit of poodle and brittany, as the state of the current Cavaliers is just shameful. Maybe you would be interested in this type of dog? Poundlane Spaniels is the kennel.

ZaraD
Posts:577
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Location:Staffordshire, UK

Re: Advice needed one last time?

Post by ZaraD » Fri Nov 03, 2017 6:51 am

Lotsaquestions wrote:
Fri Nov 03, 2017 6:44 am
I've met plenty of goldens young and old. I wouldn't call them hyper at all, and they do seem to be alot more mellow than a lab, but as teenagers they are crocodiles and think its great to jump up and mouth and mug for food. Obviously this is a training / age issue, but there will probably be a point in the dogs life where it will jump up and try to bowl over your mom and be very demanding for attention. If you're mom is left on her own to take care of a young, bouncy teenage butthead of a golden then you would probably have to make sure the dog is thoroughly exhausted before hand and have a stash of frozen kongs ready!

But these dogs can make great therapy / assistance dogs for a reason, so eventually with proper training and finding the right breeder (show line or assistance dog lines perhaps?) you'll end up with a fab dog that your mom could handle so long as one of you is willing to give it the exercise and stimulation it needs to remain mellow.

Having said that there are plenty of small / medium dogs that have a similar sort of personality, but are easier to manage. Coton de tulear for example are happy, biddable, playful little things. A Papillon even, they are full of beans and need as much stimulation as a golden so would fit you being active, but they're small and easy to handle for someone with health issues. I would recommend the larger size of Paps though (11inches at the shoulder) as the smaller are quite frail.
Thank you so much for your advice. Well my mom has only just told me she wants to become more active as she's fed up of staying in but doesn't have a reason to go out now and she feels the Golden could help with this. She says she understands that they will be hooligans as pups and is happy to deal with this until they mature. Lots of golden owners have told me there much calmer and mellower than Labrador and my mom really likes this about them.

My mom has told me all she really wants is a dog who will be calm in the house and will happily relax and watch TV with her once we have given the dog the physical and mental stimulation needed. Would the golden suit this description?

And for a show line golden would puzzle toys\ brain games, play and training be enough mental stimulation?

Lotsaquestions
Posts:646
Joined:Wed Aug 23, 2017 6:06 am

Re: Advice needed one last time?

Post by Lotsaquestions » Fri Nov 03, 2017 7:02 am

I couldn't tell you exactly what they're like in the home because I've never owned one myself, just met alot at parks, group walks, training etc: I do know that of the young ones I've met they get alot of exercise and mental stimulation, and they were show lines. They are also pretty great as passing their KC awards at young ages so are eager to soak up what you throw at them, and always listen to their owners far better than my Spitzy dog :lol:

One of them that I met was a 8 month old boy, and I got talking with their owners while our dogs wrestled about. They told me he was really active and had a bad habit of running up to dogs and being rude (jumping on them) because he just constantly wants to play. During the actual training however he was LOVING it, tail wagging really happy to be working. So I expect they would adore being made to 'work' at brain games, scent games, and retrieves even if they're show lines, and that this would be a great way to tire them out. Whether or not it will be enough I couldn't say, all the young ones I met were still full of beans... But then they could have just plonked when they got home for all I know!

Suzette
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Re: Advice needed one last time?

Post by Suzette » Fri Nov 03, 2017 8:29 am

There are no absolutes, even with purebred dogs. But in general, goldens are still a good choice for your family situation. I have had a golden and my daughter has one right now. As puppies, they are as energetic and bouncy as any puppy. But as adults, if you get one from a great breeder, they tend to be relatively calm and gentle around people when trained well and exercised properly (both mentally and physically).

There will always be exceptions with any breed, but seek out a very reputable breeder who puts time and effort into not only great conformation but one that breeds for intelligence and calmness as well. There are a lot of breeders out there who put little to no time or effort into this, but there are some great ones who do. My daughter's breeder is highly sought after in our area because his dogs are well known to grow into healthy, intelligent, calm, sensible, gentle companions because he breeds very carefully and thoughtfully for these qualities.

Wishing you all the best!
My avatar is Piper, my sweet Pembroke Corgi. b. 5/11/11

ZaraD
Posts:577
Joined:Sat Feb 04, 2017 10:06 am
Location:Staffordshire, UK

Re: Advice needed one last time?

Post by ZaraD » Fri Nov 03, 2017 9:13 am

Suzette wrote:
Fri Nov 03, 2017 8:29 am
There are no absolutes, even with purebred dogs. But in general, goldens are still a good choice for your family situation. I have had a golden and my daughter has one right now. As puppies, they are as energetic and bouncy as any puppy. But as adults, if you get one from a great breeder, they tend to be relatively calm and gentle around people when trained well and exercised properly (both mentally and physically).

There will always be exceptions with any breed, but seek out a very reputable breeder who puts time and effort into not only great conformation but one that breeds for intelligence and calmness as well. There are a lot of breeders out there who put little to no time or effort into this, but there are some great ones who do. My daughter's breeder is highly sought after in our area because his dogs are well known to grow into healthy, intelligent, calm, sensible, gentle companions because he breeds very carefully and thoughtfully for these qualities.

Wishing you all the best!

Thank you so much Suzette I was hoping you would see this as I know you have owned a Goldie. Iv also asked on a Golden retriever fourm and there are quiet a few who have said that there in the early 60's too who also have arthritis and have no problem handling a golden and on there they all think a golden is definitely right for us. After the advice on here and on the golden forum me and my mom are sticking with the Golden Retriever and I'm so happy as i was so settled on the golden :D

A few also told me that with the right exercise both mentally and physically golden tend to be calm and mellow in the house but a lot comes down to the individual golden and on there they told me to pick a good breeder who knows her pups temperament and can pick the right puppy for you.

Me and my mom are already aware and prepared for the roller coaster it will be for the first 2yrs and we fully understand how golden puppies and teenage golden can be a nightmare in the first 2yrs or so. My mom is happy to deal with this stage as it doesn't last forever as she said it's part of them growing up and learning.

So in conclusion I'm happy to say we're still getting a Golden Retriever :D

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