We are ready

Breed specific discussion of your favorite breed.

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Theo400

We are ready

Post by Theo400 » Tue Feb 09, 2016 9:43 am

Hello

Last time I posted I said how me and my sister are living together and we wanted to get a dog in the future but she did not want a GSD as I wanted to get one again after losing Theo last year.

After living with my sister for a few months now we have decided together that the time is right to start looking at breeds. We can't seem to choose which breed as we like all of the breeds we have gotten it down to.

We like the British Bulldog, the Border Terrier , Westie .

I was wondering if any of you could anwser a few things we would like to know about them.

Personally I like the terriers mainly the Westie as I like an active dog.

1\ what are all 3 going to be like to train?

2\ how much exercise physical and mental would they all need . Theo use to get 40min run in the morning and a 45min walk in the evening plus I use to play for about 2hrs in the afternoon with him in the garden a mixture of the flirtpole , search game and fetch?

3\ how often does each of them bark. Theo would bark when someone was at the door and when he was talking to me. I know terriers bark a lot but can they be trained to not bark when told as that's my main concern with a Terrier?

4\ health issues I'm fine about but is there anything else I should be aware about either of the breeds besides health?

Looking forward to hearing from you all

ScarletSci
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Re: We are ready

Post by ScarletSci » Tue Feb 09, 2016 9:02 pm

Hopefully someone more experienced will be along soon to advise, but personally, I'd rule out the Bulldog, given what you want to do with the dog. In my experience, they do very little, so all the activities you'd like to do and long walks wouldn't work with a bulldog. I also wouldn't get one because of the numerous health issues, but that's just me.

Next 'easiest' would be a Westie. They're trainable, active enough, but not as demanding and 'work-y' as other terriers. I'd say they're a pretty good beginners terrier.

Border Terriers - I have a real soft spot for. But they are a more working terrier breed, so you need to be on your game in raising them and training them. Easy to train, but smart, and might challenge you if you're not experienced! But every Border I've ever known has been sweet natured and delightful.

It's impossible to tell you how easy each will be to train, that depends on your skill level as a trainer and on the personality of the dog. Either terrier is trainable, but I'd find a positive methods based class to attend, especially since you've only had one dog before of of a very different breed type. Border terriers were bred to work, so will take pretty much all the exercise and mental stimulation you can give them. Westies were bred to work too, but have been mainly companion pets for a lot longer, so tend to be a little less demanding. These are very broad generalisations.

Barking... view barking as the communication it is. Dogs don't bark for the sake of it (even if it seems that way at times!) I've never seen a time where a dog has barked without trying to communicate something... even if the something is just frustration! Or a noise too far away for you to hear. It's possible to train a dog to 'speak' and 'quiet', and when my dogs alert bark to a knock on the door or a strange sound outside, I've taught them "thank you, I've got it", and they know their job is done and stop.

My younger girl got into the habit of 'shrill, demanding attention bark' - a single high pitched bark while staring at me, often in a play bow, or with expectant ears, when she wanted my attention or wanted me to fetch a toy she'd lost under a piece of furniture or something. But that was my fault, I encouraged that by laughing and obeying her command! She's mostly trained out of it now, and has learned that's not the way to get attention. So even bad habit barking is a valid form of communication, and can be worked around with the right training.

Can I ask how you narrowed it down to these three breeds? What's your selection process/criteria?
Do you work? How active do you want to be in terms of specific training/walking/ etc? Will this be a shared dog between you and your sister? How actively involved does she want to be in training/walking/raising a dog? What qualities do you both want/not want?

Theo400

Re: We are ready

Post by Theo400 » Wed Feb 10, 2016 3:05 am

Hi

Well we choose these three because when we got to what size jen said small only so I allowed to have a small do as long as I can rule out the small breeds in don't like.

When looking in dog breed books in was only appealed to the Westie and border terrier.

My sister added the bulldog but I agree with you that they would not match us.

Jen will be doing just as much as me exept for walking I will be mainly walking the dog as she works out 5 days a week were I'm at home all the time.

Westie are my favourite small dog even before I got Theo as I did a school project on them at school which that's a long time ago now.

I have always been told that borders are the softer terrier and that westies are snappy and hard to train?

Borders I like there appearance (otter face) and I like that there more worky as I wanted to do something Terrier-y with him.

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Nettle
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Re: We are ready

Post by Nettle » Wed Feb 10, 2016 3:33 am

Possibly you don't know what 'work' is in terrier terms - it means killing rats and other small varmints, plus going down holes after bigger ones. YOU DO NOT WANT DOGS THAT NEED TO DO THIS.

Borders are lovely - no reason why you shouldn't get one - but keep away from wildlife. Westies are easier in that respect - ScarletSci has given a good description of each. Both have a significant coat care commitment and certain health issues so you need to source your dog carefully.
A dog is never bad or naughty - it is simply being a dog

SET YOURSELF UP FOR SUCCESS

Theo400

Re: We are ready

Post by Theo400 » Wed Feb 10, 2016 3:36 am

Hi Nettle

Thanks for telling me that, yep defiantly don't want to be doing that.

I just don't know how to choose the breed plus I really want a large dog?

I think I shall talk to my sister again and get back to you all. :)

Theo400

Re: We are ready

Post by Theo400 » Wed Feb 10, 2016 7:00 am

Hi guys

I have spoken with my sister as she was on her break half an hour ago. She said she choose small as she thought they would be easier to live with and that they would not need that much exercise :roll: I told her that is not always the case and that it depends on the breed and the dog. I told her how I feel more confident with a larger breed as I'm use to dealing with them , I also pointed out that I would be walking the dog anyway.

After a long conversation she agreed to large breed. We went through together what we do and don't want and have got list of wants and don't wants and we were hoping maybe after telling you these maybe you could give us breed recommendations and we can research the breeds and then meet the ones we like at crufts this year.

OK what we don't want first:

1\ my sister is adamant on not having a GSD which is sad for me with how much I loved Theo and how much I love the breed.

2\ other large breeds she is not interested in are all large hounds or poodles or boxer or rottweilers or doberman or any mastiff again I had to hold my thoughts in as I'm lucky she said large and in all honestly I don't care what breed we choose as I really like all large dogs but clearly my sister does not.

3\ grooming no more than what a long coat GSD would need as I would not be able to go to a groomer a lot.

4\ drooling , I don't mind but jen does not want it to the extreme of like a saint Bernard.

5\ barking again a dog who can be trained that once they have alerted me then there job is done.

6/ snoring I can't deal with

7/ I'm not fond of dogs who are overly friendly with strangers like my brothers Labrador just LOVES everyone and goes up to people to be petted.

8/ my sister is not interested in rare breed (were in the UK)

Things we do want:

1\ large in size so from a Labrador up to a giant schnauzer.

2\ protective trait I would like a dog who is protective of his people and will alert me when things are not right.

3\ engery level medium not hyper like a border collie.

4\ a dog who will enjoy tow walks a day plus around 2hrs of activity a day.

5\ easy to train and who is willing to please you ( easy to train is more important than willing to please)

Also please keep in mind this is her first dog and my second.

So what do you all think which breeds match us?

mansbestfriend
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Re: We are ready

Post by mansbestfriend » Wed Feb 10, 2016 8:00 am

How about a Boxer dog? :)
The journey of a thousand miles begins with a single Sit.

Theo400

Re: We are ready

Post by Theo400 » Wed Feb 10, 2016 8:02 am

Hi

Thanks for the recommendation but my sister is not keen on them I stated that in my post were I put what breeds she does not like.

Any other recommendations?

JudyN
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Re: We are ready

Post by JudyN » Wed Feb 10, 2016 9:45 am

I'm wondering if you should drop the protective trait from the list. It's true it could be an advantage in some situations, but it may lead you to wanting a breed that is more likely to be reactive to strangers and that the dog might react when you don't want it to. The cons may well outweigh the pros.

Also, your sister says 'no hounds', does she mean all hound breeds and groups? They are so many and varied and you don't want to rule them all out from the start.
Jasper, lurcher, born December 2009

Theo400

Re: We are ready

Post by Theo400 » Wed Feb 10, 2016 10:09 am

Hi JudyN

I have been thinking that myself. As that does not leave much breeds left and my sister is very picky. So I shall drop the protective trait.

With hounds it is all large hound both scent and sight which is annoying as I like lurchers and greyhounds and Bloodhounds and a few others but jen is not struck on them. She thinks lurchers and greyhounds are to thin in appearance which I don't really get :roll: .

After taking the protective trait off and all other things above still count which breed would match.

JudyN
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Re: We are ready

Post by JudyN » Wed Feb 10, 2016 11:16 am

I would get a long list of all registered breeds in the UK, and maybe common crossbreeds, cross out all the ones that are nonstarters for you, get her to do the same, and see what's left :lol:

I did wonder about rough collie. They aren't anything like as demanding as border collies though you'd have to make sure you got one that was bred for a good temperament as they can be nervy. I know you don't want a big grooming commitment, but the one we had when I was a child got an occasional groom with a 'human' hairbrush and her coat was much more manageable than the Yorkshire terrier we had. You can also get smooth collies but they're pretty rare.
Jasper, lurcher, born December 2009

Theo400

Re: We are ready

Post by Theo400 » Wed Feb 10, 2016 12:01 pm

Hiya

I let my sister make a list instead of me as my list would be much longer :lol: .

So on the list are

Golden retriever
Labrador
Giant schnauzer
German pointer
Italian spinion
Dalmatian
Flat coat retriever
Large munsterlander

ScarletSci
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Re: We are ready

Post by ScarletSci » Wed Feb 10, 2016 12:02 pm

How about a pointer or a setter?

Snoring? Dude, really? Avoid pushed in face dogs like bulldogs, pekes, pugs, since they're more likely to snore, but otherwise, it's the luck of the draw! That's an oddly specific thing that no one can guarantee.

I think a pointer or a setter would suit you guys more, non-threatening (since it seems your sister is afraid of the dogs that come with a reputation) but they don't tend to go as mad over strangers as something like a lab or most spaniels.

Again, gundogs, so you have to watch wildlife and train them right. Research the breeds extensively if they appeal, and look into activities they'd enjoy, like scent work or agility.

Theo400

Re: We are ready

Post by Theo400 » Wed Feb 10, 2016 12:11 pm

Hiya

Snoring went on as I snore myself which drives my sister crazy so I thought I would mention it as I know some of the flat faced breeds can snore :) .

I am interested in German pointers but iv read they are full of engery like border collies and that they are not for novice owners (I'm thinking of my sister )

ScarletSci
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Re: We are ready

Post by ScarletSci » Wed Feb 10, 2016 12:13 pm

Theo400 wrote:Hiya

I let my sister make a list instead of me as my list would be much longer :lol: .

So on the list are

Golden retriever
Labrador
Giant schnauzer
German pointer
Italian spinion
Dalmatian
Flat coat retriever
Large munsterlander
Dalmatians are wonderful dogs - but I don't recommend them as a beginners dog. They're also far more high energy than people expect, they need a LOT of exercise to keep them healthy (and remember that they were bred to rn alongside horse carriages to protect, so they can run and run all day when fit and healthy - endurance athelete of a dog), are prone to being a bit 'mad', so need mental stimulation and direction, and really, an experienced handler to channel their energies properly.

Giant Munsterlanders are on my dream wish list too, since they look a lot like giant Springer Spaniels. I'm thinking the pointer/setter group would be the best fit for you guys.

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