'Aggression' - some things to think about.

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RKD
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Re: 'Aggression' - some things to think about.

Post by RKD » Wed Jul 20, 2011 2:14 pm

ournewpup wrote:Hi Emmabeth, I love your article, I can really relate to what you say and our puppy
I am hoping you may be able to help with my problem. We have a new pup, a border collie, 14 weeks old now, and he is constantly nipping my daughter, her ankles and legs, running round and jumping up at her, and pulling her clothes and tearing them. The nipping is constant. My daughter is not little, she is 14 and as tall as me so he can't think is one of his pup mates. She has been coming in the room and ignoring him initially if he wants attention and will talk to us instead and wait for him to calm down. But he is so persistent, and won't give up. She will tell him 'no bite' and he goes mad cos he has got the attention. His nipping is becoming a real problem, as he is getting bigger quickly and is now hurting her. She loves him to bits and is really upset he is being like this. He does not do this with me or my husband - he does forget himself sometimes when excited and will start mouthing and maybe a little nip, but is always told off and we withdraw. But my poor daughter tries to tell him off and withdraw and he won't let her!! I understand about time out, but physically getting him out of the room into another is impossible for her.
Any advice would be gratefully received!


Hi have a similar problem that we are working on, looking forward to any tips. Mine is a Lab/Colle 6mths old. Have had him from 4.5 months.

emmabeth
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Re: 'Aggression' - some things to think about.

Post by emmabeth » Wed Jul 20, 2011 2:51 pm

Hiya,

Can you come start a post in the Dog Training Advice section, give us as much detail as you can and we'll help.
West Midlands based 1-2-1 Training & Behaviour Canine Consultant

Roswalien
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Re: 'Aggression' - some things to think about.

Post by Roswalien » Fri Jul 29, 2011 4:46 pm

I actually came to this site to avoid the behaviorist ideology.

I have a female pitbull type dog, who appears to be a purebreed pit, but who knows really. I have had her since she was a little under a year old and she is my first pitbull type dog. (I did not intentionally get her, she was abandoned in my neighborhood and there are no options for homeless pitbulls in my area, they are euthanized. Since she got along with every person she came into contact with and seemingly got along with other dogs, and had no serious health problems, I couldn't give her up. She is well trained now, but has limited experience with other dogs) I am living with friends who have a male black lab. The black lab had lived in the home for about six-months before I moved in with my dog.

My dog got into a minor fight with my boyfriend's mother's female pitbull type dog several months before I moved in with them. Blood was drawn and they refused to let go of each other but there were only a few scratches when they were finally separated. I think the scratches would have been punctures instead if we had not separated them the way we did. Is it true that female pitts tend to not get along with other female pitts? This is abnormal dog behavior and dogs should be kept separated, right?

Now my pittbull and the black lab have lived together for over a year. It sounds like they fight but blood is never drawn. They just high-pitch bark at each other and seem to mouth each other, but they never truly bite. After reading this article am I to understand that this is normal dog behavior?

I don't want anything to escalate to a real fight because the black lab would obviously be overpowered and could be seriously hurt. I also want to know how I should introduce her to other dogs properly. There are no dog trainers within 300 miles of my location except a behaviorist trainer at my local petco.

Sorry What do you guys think?

emmabeth
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Re: 'Aggression' - some things to think about.

Post by emmabeth » Fri Jul 29, 2011 7:44 pm

It is not at ALL unusual for two bitches to take against one another and hate each other on sight - when that happens the sensible thing to do is keep them seperate and in 99% of cases I wouldn't DREAM of attempting to get them to like one another. It is exceedingly unlikely to happen and highly likely to result in the severe injury or death of one or both bitches. So whilst it is actually very very normal, it is unusual in that you are unlikely to change or improve it.

However ***** v dog - high pitched barking and mouthing and wrestling sounds like play to me - as long as they don't go so far taht they then fall out, (ie either can call time and the other respects this) and they don't do it all around your house smashing things up, its fine. I personally don't let my dogs do this but I have five dogs, a small house and not all of them can say 'hey, lets quit now' so it can lead to trouble, but it isn't a real problem, it is just over-wrought play.
West Midlands based 1-2-1 Training & Behaviour Canine Consultant

ladybug1802
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Location: Surrey

Re: 'Aggression' - some things to think about.

Post by ladybug1802 » Fri Aug 19, 2011 11:09 am

When Dylan plays with some dogs he gets quite 'growly'.....but it is just play! He likes to run round, mouth the other dog and generally make noises! But if the other dog isnt up for it, or doesnt play that way, neither does he!

arshadarsha47
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Joined: Thu May 24, 2012 10:00 pm

Re: 'Aggression' - some things to think about.

Post by arshadarsha47 » Thu May 24, 2012 10:29 pm

What is an appropriate spot for a time-out - is their crate okay or should it be a different room and if so, can it be a room with windows in the door or should they not be able to see us at all - my 10 week old pug nips and bits out toes and pant legs with every step and dispite my "no" she will not stop - thinking time-out is the best way to handle it?

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minkee
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Re: 'Aggression' - some things to think about.

Post by minkee » Sun May 27, 2012 1:38 pm

We have a great thread about timeouts here: viewtopic.php?f=20&t=13934

Taelor
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Re: 'Aggression' - some things to think about.

Post by Taelor » Mon Aug 20, 2012 11:58 pm

Hi Em,
I appreciate the advice that you posted about the aggressive behavior in puppies. Do you have any suggestions for adult dogs? I have tried the time out method but it seems to not be working so well.
I adopted my dog about 2 years ago. I found her as a stray when she was already fully grown, around 4 years old. I recognized immediately that she was never trained, but she is a very fast learner. She now knows the following commands very well: Sit, lay down, stay, shake, other paw, "bang" (play dead), hurry, slow down, inside, outside, get your food, get water. However, she has had a difficult time learning "leave it", especially when it comes to other dogs.
She lives with a cat, which she has never shown any aggressive behavior toward. Unfamiliar cats on the other hand she tries to chase. She plays well with other large dogs, but when I first got her she was attacked by three little dogs on two separate occasions. Ever since she was attacked by the little dogs, as soon as a little dog becomes aggressive anywhere near her she wants to go after it but I do not allow her to.
I try to socialize her with calm small dogs from time to time and she does fine. If a little dog is near her, and tries to play, she sniffs the dog but if the dog runs away she acts like it's a game of chase which I do not allow fearing she my either just step on the dog while chasing. Also, I fear if the little dog becomes aggressive for whatever reason she may attack.
Today that fear came true... Both her and the little dog where on leashes. At first everything was fine. Both dogs where sniffing each other and interacting fine, but when the little dog tried to turn and run to start to play my dog grabbed the little dog around its rib cage and held it in her mouth without perforating the skin. The owner of the little dog and I where able to separate them quickly without any bloodshed, thankfully.
I gave the woman my name and number so if she took the dog to the vet she could get a hold of me by phone to collect any necessarily compensation. I don't have much money, but I'll do whatever it takes to fix the behavioral issues.
Thank you so much for your time, and I appreciate any advice I may receive. -Taelor

Bo_love7
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Re: 'Aggression' - some things to think about.

Post by Bo_love7 » Thu Nov 13, 2014 3:08 pm

I posted a question for help yesterday, and was referred to this post. It is really helpful. I've been doing the 'time out' method and have seen some improvement. One thing that Bo,my 5 week old husky puppy, does is bite and then I'll attempt to walk away, but he grabs ahold of my pants or socks and I don't want to yank away from him to get away or have him think I'm playing tug-of-war, so I calmly remove my clothing by opening his mouth and then either grab a toy to take his attention off of me or I'll place him by himself for about ten seconds. He starts whining and I let him. Then I'll walk back in and he'll either do it again and I'll have to repeat or he'll just not bite. I hope I'm doing the right thing! My family think they have to 'be dominant' over him, but I keep telling them that flicking his nose or holding his mouth shut and telling him 'no' isn't going to help. Please let me know if what I'm doing is the right thing. Thanks. :D

Ari_RR
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Re: 'Aggression' - some things to think about.

Post by Ari_RR » Thu Nov 13, 2014 10:36 pm

Yes it is. Also, I would try to grab a toy and redirect him to the toy before he gets a hold of your pants.. Just watch him, observe and soon you will be able to predict, see the biting coming.

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