Behavioral & Physical Effects of Spaying/Neutering

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Noobs
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Behavioral & Physical Effects of Spaying/Neutering

Post by Noobs » Fri Mar 04, 2011 10:24 am

http://www.caninesports.com/SNBehaviorB ... apShot.pdf

"Our data showed that the behavior of neutered dogs was significantly different from that of intact dogs in ways that contradict the prevailing view. Among the findings, neutered dogs were more aggressive, fearful, excitable, and less trainable than intact dogs."

And from several members of this forum, a big, fat...DUH.

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Mattie
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Re: Behavioral & Physical Effects of Spaying/Neutering

Post by Mattie » Fri Mar 04, 2011 10:40 am

Thanks Noobs, I suspect that Cyril was neutered early, not because he is aggressive he isn't, but he is still a puppy in his brain and he is at least 2 years old. Yes, he isn't easy to train, he has no concentration but it is improving slightly.
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Nettle
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Re: Behavioral & Physical Effects of Spaying/Neutering

Post by Nettle » Fri Mar 04, 2011 11:31 am

THANK YOU :D Noobs. As I sometimes say: Science doesn't create truth but it catches up with it from time to time.
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Re: Behavioral & Physical Effects of Spaying/Neutering

Post by nightsrainfall » Fri Mar 04, 2011 2:32 pm

That's really interesting. Since it's a summary, I'm curious in the full thesis now. It'd be interesting to see the percent of total population that made up each group and the households they came from as well - which I would bet would be mentioned in the full article. But, I'm glad to see more studies being done on these types of things.

I wish there were more ways to control populations in the areas that have an overpopulation problem, so that spaying/neutering doesn't get "pushed" so much by organizations.
- Anna

"Dogs are not our whole life, but they make our lives whole."
~ Roger A. Caras

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Nettle
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Re: Behavioral & Physical Effects of Spaying/Neutering

Post by Nettle » Fri Mar 04, 2011 3:05 pm

It's very difficult, given that there is a remarkable number of people who don't bother to keep their animals properly. My issue with neutering is having it done too soon: a lot of problems are much reduced by waiting until the dog is mature - but that can still mean accidental litters where people are careless or dumb.

However, some of the issues - like spayed b itch incontinence - can arise even if the b itch is spayed after maturity. Having lived with this for the best part of fourteen years (she was spayed at 4 and died at nearly 18) I am never having another b itch spayed unless for unavoidable medical reasons. I am happy to keep entire animals but I recognise that an enhanced level of care is needed. I do really get cross at the assumption that ALL people who decline to have their dogs neutered are automatically irresponsible.

So first we need the professionals to admit that the health and behaviour problems really exist - and maybe we might get better methods of surgery.

Because as far as people go - sadly, you can't fix stupid. :?
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Re: Behavioral & Physical Effects of Spaying/Neutering

Post by Mattie » Sat Mar 05, 2011 4:43 am

My vets now do keyhole surgery for spaying but it is twice the price of a normal spay.
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Re: Behavioral & Physical Effects of Spaying/Neutering

Post by Nettle » Sat Mar 05, 2011 4:53 am

If it addresses the incontinence issues, it's money well spent. You spend the money once, but incontinence is 24/7/365. But i wonder if it does? I wonder if anyone is keeping records?
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Re: Behavioral & Physical Effects of Spaying/Neutering

Post by Mattie » Sat Mar 05, 2011 6:20 am

I read somewhere that the womb isn't taken away so the risks of pyrometra is still the same as an entire *****, I don't know if this is true or not.
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Re: Behavioral & Physical Effects of Spaying/Neutering

Post by Nettle » Sat Mar 05, 2011 11:23 am

Ah. Now I have discussed that with my vet. That would be where they take the ovaries only. As you say, there is still the risk of pyo - so pointless really.
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jacksdad
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Re: Behavioral & Physical Effects of Spaying/Neutering

Post by jacksdad » Sat Mar 05, 2011 2:04 pm

we need a doggy birth control pill :wink:

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Re: Behavioral & Physical Effects of Spaying/Neutering

Post by GundogGuy » Tue Mar 08, 2011 5:42 am

It's funny how science is always right when it reinforces what you thought or believed already but when it doesn't then it 'can't be trusted... I'd be interested to know who filled out the questionnaires. One man's aggression is another mans excitability :lol:

As previously stated on this forum, quite often science is a matter of interpretation, opinion and the results of variable methods... Interesting to read though.

Many people (including vets) recommend castrating 'aggressive' male dogs when in fact they are 'fearful' male dogs. Once done, they are subject to all manner of intrusive attention from other dogs because they are interested to learn why this dog smells different which of course can make fearfulness and reactiveness worse...
"Oh what gold there is to find when one is blessed with an open mind" - me, not five minutes ago :-)

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Re: Behavioral & Physical Effects of Spaying/Neutering

Post by nightsrainfall » Tue Mar 08, 2011 9:09 am

The studies I've read have shown this both ways - but more are showing it towards the behavioral issue side - that said, they aren't really "working with the varible" or preforming an experiment persay because most of the studies are real dogs, real owners - thus there's a difference in actions with and towards the dog. Right now everything I've seen is just at the observation phase. I only research it from time to time though so my info may be outdated. From what I know from a biology/genetics based friend is no one has really figured out biochemstry and mental responses yet in general, so observation is really the most that we have. It may be that spaying and neutring has an effect because of the experience and then the response of the owners, or it could be something chemical/biological.

Oh but if you like joking with science (Which I do), you should check out this site - http://sound.westhost.com/laws.htm

The ones I have posted at my work (which is a research-based job) are:
Rule of Accuracy: When working toward the solution of a problem, it always helps if you know the answer.
Law of Research:Enough research will tend to support your theory
Wyszowski's Law: No experiment is reproducible.
Finagle's First Law: If an experiment works, something has gone wrong.
Fett's Law:Never replicate a successful experiment.

:-D
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Re: Behavioral & Physical Effects of Spaying/Neutering

Post by Noobs » Tue Mar 08, 2011 10:29 am

GundogGuy wrote:One man's aggression is another mans excitability :lol:
And that's why when people come on here and say their dog is aggressive, we ask for a ton of details because most of the time, we know it isn't.

I'm not saying science is right when I agree, I think science is at times ridiculous. Caffeine is bad for you. Then one cup of coffee is beneficial. Alcohol is bad for you. Then one or two glasses of wine per day can prevent heart attacks. Eggs are bad, too much cholesterol. No, eggs are actually fine! :evil:

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Nettle
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Re: Behavioral & Physical Effects of Spaying/Neutering

Post by Nettle » Tue Mar 08, 2011 11:53 am

It's funny how science is always right when it reinforces what you thought or believed already but when it doesn't then it 'can't be trusted...

Nah, that's not it at all :lol: science is right when it finds out not what anyone thought or believed but what vast numbers of involved people already knew from experience :mrgreen:
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Re: Behavioral & Physical Effects of Spaying/Neutering

Post by horza » Tue Mar 08, 2011 1:43 pm

ive got a nearly 5month lab/GSD cross. we have never had a spayed b itch in our house before and this has made me quite concered.

we HAVE to have her spayed, as it was in our contract from the rescue. they say to do it after the first season, but i think we should wait.

any thoughts???
Natalie

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