Question?

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ZaraD
Posts: 577
Joined: Sat Feb 04, 2017 10:06 am
Location: Staffordshire, UK

Question?

Post by ZaraD » Tue Jul 10, 2018 7:47 am

Hi all

Ok so there's something if wanted to ask for a while now and thought I will just go ahead and ask, I have a fascination with assistance dogs and think it's amazing what they dog for there people and in particular I have always wondered why labs , goldens, cockers are used mainly for children with autism? Why not other breeds like German shepherds, Bernese mountain dogs ect...

I can see why labs , Goldie's are mainly the breed for guide dogs and disability dogs but why are they best for children \ people with autism?

The reason this interests me is because I know a few people with autism and they all own with labs or labs x goldens. And the reason all picked there breed was based on them being best with autism.

Erica
Posts: 2694
Joined: Fri Aug 05, 2011 9:35 pm
Location: North Carolina

Re: Question?

Post by Erica » Tue Jul 10, 2018 4:35 pm

GSDs are more sensitive to their handlers' emotions. That's why they are alright as guide dogs or physical assistance dogs, but are not often used for psychiatric work. Labs and goldens still pick up on their handler's emotions, but don't break down if their handler has a panic attack (usually). Since people with autism are sometimes affected by sensory overload or anxiety in certain situations, having a steady dog that doesn't react negatively to anxiety is desirable.
Delta, standard poodle, born 6/30/14

ZaraD
Posts: 577
Joined: Sat Feb 04, 2017 10:06 am
Location: Staffordshire, UK

Re: Question?

Post by ZaraD » Wed Jul 11, 2018 2:39 am

Erica wrote:
Tue Jul 10, 2018 4:35 pm
GSDs are more sensitive to their handlers' emotions. That's why they are alright as guide dogs or physical assistance dogs, but are not often used for psychiatric work. Labs and goldens still pick up on their handler's emotions, but don't break down if their handler has a panic attack (usually). Since people with autism are sometimes affected by sensory overload or anxiety in certain situations, having a steady dog that doesn't react negatively to anxiety is desirable.
Interesting, I get it now , another person I know has a flat coat retriever.

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