air travel

Get to know other Positively members here.

Moderators:emmabeth, BoardHost

Post Reply
erin
Posts:53
Joined:Sun Sep 02, 2012 2:58 pm
air travel

Post by erin » Mon Aug 19, 2013 4:33 pm

Hi guys!
Does anyone have any experience on the terms and conditions when travelling with dogs via airplane? I did a quick google search but it gets sooo stuffy and no real information, really... I mean, no much info on how it's done, who's responsible, in charge, etc.
I am contemplating returning home, to Romania, and would like to find out first the best way for Molly to travel... If anyone knows anything, I would much appreciate any information!

DianeLDL
Posts:832
Joined:Sun May 19, 2013 4:16 pm
Location:Maine USA

Re: air travel

Post by DianeLDL » Mon Aug 19, 2013 6:12 pm

Erin,

I would contact the airline that you will be traveling. They each have their own rules and regulations.

Something to keep in mind is from where you be flying to Romania and if you will be changing planes.
Also, are there quarantine issues?

My sister flew her Welsh Corgi from California to Hawaii (both within the United States, and she had to put Yoda into quarantine for a couple of weeks.

Also, I don't know the size of your dog. For example, within the US mainland on Southwest Airlines, small dogs are allowed in the cabin, but must be in a crate that allows the dog to stand and turn around while under the seat in front of you, also, if oxygen masks come down, you are forbidden to give the dog oxygen. Also, they require a vets certificate within 10 days of the flight.

So, as I said, contact the airline you plan to use as well as Romania to find out if there are any quarantine or other vaccination issues. Be as knowledgable as possible before booking your flight. You may need to check and compare the requirements for different airlines.

Hope all works out. :D
Diane
Sandy, Chihuahua mix b. 12/20/09

gwd
Posts:1958
Joined:Tue Aug 14, 2012 11:33 pm

Re: air travel

Post by gwd » Mon Aug 19, 2013 7:08 pm

DianeLDL wrote:My sister flew her Welsh Corgi from California to Hawaii (both within the United States, and she had to put Yoda into quarantine for a couple of weeks.
while Hawaii is a state, given it's a rabies free island they wish to keep it that way and thus the requirements.

you can get a direct release from the airport but it takes 120+ days of pre-planning......mircrochipping, proof of vaccination, and titer testing from one of two labs and then the 120 day wait begins. if you transport the dogs prior to the 120 days you must complete the full quarantine period.
Image

dontpugme
Posts:1294
Joined:Thu Oct 29, 2009 8:01 pm
Location:Houston, Texas

Re: air travel

Post by dontpugme » Mon Aug 19, 2013 10:12 pm

Since Molly is a lab, she wouldn't be able to fly in the cabin. I recommend checking the websites of the potential airlines and also find testimonials of other pet owners. Honestly, flying animals in the cargo hold terrifies me. I know only the horror stories about airlines and pets get published and that plenty of people have flown their dogs with no problem.

I haven't read much about flying pets internationally, so I have no idea how customs would treat a pet. I know on domestic flights, the same people who handle the bags handle the crates. The crates are the last ones on the plane (which can subject them to some not so nice temperatures) and the first ones off the plane.


I don't know how long that flight to Romania would be or whether Molly would be able to handle it.



Kind of off topic, but when we were thinking about flying with Max, the lack of oxygen for him in an emergency really scared me. I did a little research on the Southwest Airlines planes, and apparently some of the rows have 4 masks instead of 3 for a baby. I haven't read that it is forbidden to give your pet oxygen, only that it will not be provided. In the scramble of oxygen masks being needed, I certainly hope the flight attendant wouldn't mind me grabbing the extra one for Max.
--dontpugme

DianeLDL
Posts:832
Joined:Sun May 19, 2013 4:16 pm
Location:Maine USA

Re: air travel

Post by DianeLDL » Tue Aug 20, 2013 6:47 am

You would have to know which Southwest planes and which rows have those extra oxygen masks. Also, on SW, you can't reserve seats, and if there are a lot of babies, there may be a problem.

I sat on a SW flight to Oakland, CA from Albuquerque, NM. the only nonstop to the area. Next to me the woman had a new puppy she was bringing home from a breeder in New Mexico to N. Calif. the poor thing was whimpering and the flight attendants kept coming over to make sure all was okay but also to get her to keep the puppy quiet, (The woman commented to me that they wouldn't say that to someone whose baby was crying.) Before we took off, they told her that the puppy was not allowed to use oxygen if the masks came down. The new owner, who has had dogs before and knew what could happen told me she would share her mask with the puppy, each taking alternate breaths if she had to) Also, she had the puppy part way out of the soft baggage type crate, and the crew kept telling her the puppy had to stay inside crate. :roll:

Also, on SW, since that is the airline I fly more frequently, only two dogs are allowed in the cabin on any trip,

I also believe it was SW, an assistive dog for Paws and Stripes for a PTSD veteran wasn't going to be allowed in the cabin, it il after much protesting, since he could prove the dog was an assistive one, he was allowed to keep the dog on the floor next to his feet on the plane, but it was a real fight and he had to go to management over it! :D

The big problem with a non-assistive dog is that being in the baggage area, if you don't have a direct flight, it can be h..l for the dog. That is where I have heard the horror stories. Dog being transferred to wrong plane. If plane sits on Tarmac for hours in heat, dog is in this extreme heat. :cry:

The only positive for small dogs who travel in cabin is that more airports are creating dog friendly places to bathroom and get some exercise without having to go outside through TSA. :D

But, we couldn't even take our chihuahua on the plane according to Southwest, since his legs are so long, he wouldn't be able to stand in the crate under the seat. On the website, they give the dimensions. Also, the dog in crate is considered one of your carry ons. :x

Considering international flight and a lab, it is a risky situation. If you are going from London or elsewhere in Europe, I would drive it. From the US, I would make sure it is from NY Kennedy or LaGuardia or Newark and have a non-stop flight so you don't need to worry about transfers.

Good luck and do you homework in advance. Compare airlines online and call the reservations people for more info. Also, you will need to pay for the Doug's travel which can also be different between carriers. :shock:

Diane
Sandy, Chihuahua mix b. 12/20/09

erin
Posts:53
Joined:Sun Sep 02, 2012 2:58 pm

Re: air travel

Post by erin » Tue Aug 20, 2013 1:24 pm

Thank you, ladies!

We would be travelling London (UK) to Romania, so a three hours flight.. But, after speaking to someone about it, I believe driving would be the way to go. All that cargo travel sounds scary and I wouldn't want Molly in that position if there are nicer alternatives..

It would be a 40 hours drive, but what an adventure that would be, right? :) France, Belgium, Germany, Austria, Hungary and Romania, quite the trip :)

DianeLDL
Posts:832
Joined:Sun May 19, 2013 4:16 pm
Location:Maine USA

Re: air travel

Post by DianeLDL » Tue Aug 20, 2013 4:20 pm

Erin,

It sounds like you are out for a fantastic adventure. :D
Just make sure you have Molly checked by the vet and find out all documents you need for crossing borders.

I don't know about hotels and dogs in Europe, but while traveling with our dog across the USA about 3,000 miles one way, I have had to make reservations in advance to make sure dogs are allowed. Check the Internet for hotels accepting dogs and if there is a size limit. In the US, also there are pet fees and sometimes size limits which are different in each hotel. :wink:

Also, when figuring out hours and distances, we have had to figure out places that are good for Sandy our chihuahua mix to relieve himself as well as to get some exercise. We have noticed that since we got Sandy that we can drive fewer miles or km a day than just my husband and I alone. :shock:

Another thing my husband and I have learned the hard way is that after driving all day, we are always tired, and when we stop at the hotel, we want to relax, but Sandy is ready for a walk with need to explore, and ready for playtime. It is a great way to explore new places through the eyes of the dog. We notice so many different things since Sandy has been driving with us than we had noticed before on our own. :D

When you can, let us know how things are going for all of your and especially Molly, and have a great time! :D
Diane
Sandy, Chihuahua mix b. 12/20/09

Erica
Posts:2697
Joined:Fri Aug 05, 2011 9:35 pm
Location:North Carolina

Re: air travel

Post by Erica » Tue Aug 20, 2013 6:34 pm

Though it is from a news site and therefore may be exaggerated to give the most sensational effect, this article on transporting animals via airplanes is kind of scary. :( I hope you and Molly have a great time on your road trip!
Delta, standard poodle, born 6/30/14

DianeLDL
Posts:832
Joined:Sun May 19, 2013 4:16 pm
Location:Maine USA

Re: air travel

Post by DianeLDL » Tue Aug 20, 2013 9:47 pm

Erica,

I just read the article. How horrendous! :cry:

This is why we have been driving across the USA between our homes in Albuquerque, New Mexico and Bangor, Maine, and my parents in San Francisco Bay Area. Takes longer, is stressful, but Sandy is with us every step of the way. And in the summer, many of the hotels we frequent allow us to check in early so Sandy can be in air conditioning. :D

I agree with one comment. Put the airline executives to fly in baggage! :twisted:

Also, if we were to leave our pets in the car in hot weather, we would be prosecuted. But, where is the oversight for the airlines. I guess the laws don't apply. :evil:

At the Bangor Veterans clinic, there is a sign that police will be called if dog left in vehicle, so those who have no place to leave their dogs, have been brining them into the clinic. So, far no one has said anything. :D

Diane
Sandy, Chihuahua mix b. 12/20/09

User avatar
Nettle
Posts:10753
Joined:Sun Apr 13, 2008 1:40 pm

Re: air travel

Post by Nettle » Wed Aug 21, 2013 2:05 am

Erin, it's a worthwhile investment to get your own microchip scanner that you know works with your dog's chip because there is a big possibility of some border controls using faulty scanners and so leaving you in a very difficult position if they can't find the chip.

Also carry several copies of all vaccination and parasite control medication given by your vet.

If you don't need it - great. But if you do - it's there.

What an adventure! :D
A dog is never bad or naughty - it is simply being a dog

SET YOURSELF UP FOR SUCCESS

elisa
Posts:168
Joined:Wed Nov 24, 2010 11:11 am
Location:Finland
Contact:

Re: air travel

Post by elisa » Wed Aug 21, 2013 10:36 am

If you drive, make sure you can pass through all the countries with the dog. If you fly you only have to abide by the laws of the leaving and arriving country as airports are considered outside of countries. If you drive then you are in effect bringing the dog to each country in turn and leaving each country in turn. So it is worth doing your homework on this.

As for flying. I did it once with three pups in a crate in the hold with a layover. It was a bit scary, but every time me and my brother got to the plane we would ask the staff if the pups were on board and fine. Of course with adorable pups we would get answers like "yes, they are very cheeky" and such. But everything went fine.

Looking into which airlines would transport the pups was really a hastle. UK might be a problem with some airlines if I remember correctly. I did Ireland to Finland and some would not do even that without the dogs being transported separately as cargo.

If you are only ever going to do the trip once then I would just fly. Loads of dogs fly every day around the world and some show dogs back and forth the whole time for sure. Also flying could turn out to be a lot cheaper even with the costs for the crate and all.
The best friend of Ansa the sprollie since autumn 2010.
http://www.youtube.com/user/AnsaTheSprollie
Train with your brain. :)

User avatar
minkee
Posts:2034
Joined:Wed Apr 06, 2011 7:58 am
Location:Yorkshire
Contact:

Re: air travel

Post by minkee » Wed Aug 21, 2013 10:57 am

Assuming all the countries you go through are EU countries it should be fine, according to this: https://www.gov.uk/take-pet-abroad/overview :) It also lists which airlines you can use if you decide to go that route.

Obviously that's only so long as you do the necessary vaccs and paperwork. It sounds like an exciting trip!

erin
Posts:53
Joined:Sun Sep 02, 2012 2:58 pm

Re: air travel

Post by erin » Thu Aug 22, 2013 6:09 am

Thanks again for all the information!
I have decided to take the driving route and I will take all precautions to make sure everything goes as smooth as possible.
However, the decision of going is not yet definite, as I'm looking at it as a last resort to sort my s*it out :) Life's not very easy at the moment and the prospect of 'home' is very appealing, but it might be only an illusion...
Anyway, thank you for all recommendations, I have bookmarked websites and saved a couple of relevant E-mail addresses.
xx

DianeLDL
Posts:832
Joined:Sun May 19, 2013 4:16 pm
Location:Maine USA

Re: air travel

Post by DianeLDL » Thu Aug 22, 2013 4:55 pm

Erin,

Bookmarking the sites and our emails is a great idea. This type if trip takes planning and time. If you want to have fun and have time to do what you want, this is the key. :D

Good luck and let us know when you do go and post about your adventures. And of course, if you have any other questions that you think of, please ask.

FYI-Iyour question had many of us thinking. I had been getting upset about having to drive everywhere and doing all the rk in pre planning, and now I know why we drive the way we do.

Ironically, isn't east of collecting frequent flyer miles, we are earning points and with Choice Hotels in the USA, we are now Diamond members which not only gives us extra points for free stays, but we get free upgrades, even with our dog in some hotels. One Comfort Inn, we got a mini suite with a full size refrigerator, stove, dishes, and pots and pans. :D
Yes, we were on the top floor which meant taking our dog in the elevator, but it was great the treatment we received. :D

Diane
Sandy, Chihuahua mix b. 12/20/09

Post Reply