California May Ban Pet Store Dog and Cat Sales

California may be the first state to ban the sales of dogs and cats from pet stores. Lawmakers voted 44-6 to send the measure to the California state Senate. The bill from Assemblyman Patrick O'Donnell (D-Long Beach), notes that he is aware of that no responsible breeder ever sells to a pet store, and that the dogs and cats sold at pet stores are from mass producers (puppy mills).
The bill, AB485, does not allow sales of dogs, cats or rabbits - but encourages pet stores to adopt out animals from legitimate non-profit rescues and shelters.
Well over 200 communities across the U.S. and Canada, ranging from Chicago to Austin to Toronto to Albuquerque have similar pet store restrictions in place at a local level. Several counties - including Cook County, Chicago area - have a ban. Californians are already more than half way there, as most of the population resides in cities where similar pet store restrictions are in place, including Glendale, Long Beach, Los Angeles, Palm Springs, San Diego and San Francisco. In all, over 30 California communities currently limit pet store sales.
The American Kennel Club (ACK) insist on their website that the bill is anti-breeder. In fact, the bill does allow California residents to purchase animals directly from breeders, if they have an opportunity to see the living conditions of the animals. And when purchasing puppies or kittens to hopefully meet the parents. Legitimate pure bred dog breeders are not impacted, despite what the AKC says.
There has been some concern (greatly by Republicans) that the measure hurts small business (pet shops that sell dogs and cats). However, many independent small stores across the state, and across the nation, do just fine without selling dogs and cats.
Assemblyman Laura Friedman, a Democrat, said that when her city of Glendale passed a similar ordinance, the City Council didn't receive any complaints from pet stores but did see a decrease in the number of unwanted animals.
Many who oppose the bill suggest The U.S. Department of Agriculture can offer information about breeding facilities should there be questions by consumers when purchasing at pet stores. However, that is simply untrue. The USDA, which regulates commercial kennels, removed an online information of its inspection reports of the kennels from its website earlier this year, making it nearly impossible for consumers to learn about the origin of their pets, or the truth about the origin of their pets.
The Pet Industry Joint Advisory Council and AKC are among those in opposition.
Reality is that if even somehow the bill doesn't manage to go through state-wide, it's just a matter of time - and other states are also considering such laws. Meanwhiles, communities all over the country continue to ban sales of dogs and cats (and in some place rabbits) at pet stores.
California prides itself as being a progressive state. And it's about to be if the law goes through state-wide to ban pet stores from selling dogs, cats and rabbits - which would make California the first state to create such a state-wide effort.
Lawmakers voted 44-6 to send the measure to the California state Senate. The bill from Assemblyman Patrick O'Donnell (D-Long Beach), who is aware of that no responsible breeder ever sells to a pet store. And that the dogs and cats sold at pet stores are from mass producers (puppy mills).
The bill, AB485, does not allow sales - but encourages pet stores to adopt animals from legitimate non-profit rescues and shelters.
Well over 200 communities across the U.S.and Canada, ranging from Chicago to Austin to Toronto to Albuquerque have similar pet store restrictions in place at a local level. Several counties - including Cook County, Chicago area - have a ban. Californians are already more than half way there, as most of the population resides in cities where similar pet store restrictions are in place, including Glendale, Long Beach, Los Angeles, Palm Springs, San Diego and San Francisco. In all, over 30 California communities limit pet store sales.
Though the American Kennel Club (ACK) suggests the bill is anti-breeder. In fact, the bill does allow California residents to purchase animals directly from breeders, as long as they have an opportunity to see the living conditions of the animals, and when purchasing puppies or kittens to hopefully meet the parents. Legitimate pure bred dog breeders are not impacted, despite what the AKC says.
There has been some concern (greatly by Republicans) that the measure hurts small business (pet shops that sell dogs and cats). However, many independent small stores across the state, and across the nation, do just fine without selling dogs and cats.
Assemblyman Laura Friedman, a Democrat, said that when her city of Glendale passed a similar ordinance, the City Council didn't receive any complaints from pet stores but did see a decrease in the number of unwanted animals.
Many  who oppose the bill suggest The U.S. Department of Agriculture can offer information about breeding facilities should there be questions by consumers. However, that is simply untrue. The USDA, which regulates commercial kennels, removed an online information of its inspection reports of the kennels from its website, making it often nearly impossible for consumers to learn about the origin of their pets, or the truth about the origin of their pets.
The Pet Industry Joint Advisory Council and AKC are among those in opposition.
Reality is that if even somehow the bill doesn't manage to go through state-wide, it's only a matter of time - and other states are also considering such laws. Meanwhile, communities all over the country continue to ban sales of dogs and cats (and in some place rabbits) at pet stores.


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Positively Expert: Steve Dale

Steve is a certified dog and cat behavior consultant who has written several books, writes several syndicated newspaper columns, hosts two nationally syndicated radio shows, and has appeared on numerous TV shows including "The Oprah Winfrey Show," "National Geographic Explorer," and "Pets Part of the Family."


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